Processing Javascript test ….

a snap of the src


//shoots red green & blue lasers from bottom of fram to top
//or surface-to-air Star Wars anti-Communist anti-satellite
//laser defense sys emulator in 2d
//inspired by TRW Research (active per local eyewitness 10/17/16
//IP Tapper@ssstudios LA,CA
//global vars
int bluelxpos = 38;
int bluelypos = 398;
int laserwidth = 6;
int laserheight = 188;
int redlxpos = 200;
int redlypos = 366;
int gnlxpos = 325;
int gnlypos = 333;
int framecount = 0; //for testing & frame-tracking
void setup(){
size(400,400);
background(0);//k
frameRate(120);//default fr x2
framecount++;
drawlasers();
}
void drawlasers(){
//blue
fill(38, 38, 200);
rect(bluelxpos, bluelypos, laserwidth, laserheight);
//red
fill(255,0,0);
rect(redlxpos, redlypos, laserwidth, laserheight);
//gn
fill(0,255,0);
rect(gnlxpos, gnlypos, laserwidth, laserheight);
laserheight--;
}//end drawlasers
void draw(){
//shoot lasers up
//blue
fill(38, 38, 200);
bluelypos--; //delta y blue laser
rect(bluelxpos, bluelypos, laserwidth, laserheight);
if(bluelypos+laserheight==0){//refire
bluelxpos = (int)random(1,399);
bluelypos = 398;
}//end if
//rd
fill(255,0,0);
redlypos--; //delta y red laser
rect(redlxpos, redlypos, laserwidth, laserheight);
if(redlypos+laserheight==0){//refire
redlxpos = (int)random(1,399);
redlypos = 366;
}//end if
//gn
fill(0,255,0);
gnlypos--; //delta y gn laser
rect(gnlxpos, gnlypos, laserwidth, laserheight);
if(gnlypos+laserheight==0){//refire
gnlxpos = (int)random(1,399);
gnlypos = 333;
}//end if
framecount++;
}//end draw

The least common multiple of three integers; a solution in Java ….

This was inituially a troubling proposition because I’d mixed up “least common multiple” with greatest common factor. Further, the question posed to solve the LCM of three prime integers, namely; three, five and seven. I answered the question as “duh…one.” and moved on. Thx to fellow wikireviewer Eric Barnes who noted the error. I looked up the euclidean definition of what LCM really means…then coded two functions and tested them in a main class. The code is adequately introduced, commented and documented to explain the algorithm’s process, which is essetailly to calculate the LCM of 5 & 7, then save that 1st lcm and plug it into a separate function that will calulate the final LCM using 3 and “lcm of 5 & 7” as parameters.

/**we define the lcm of three ints as follows:
* LCM(a,b,c)=LCM(LCM(a,b),c)=LCM(a,LCM(b,c))
* the lcm of 3, 5 & 7 is, in fact 105
* last stable build 1/24/16 @ssstudios, los angeles, ca
* IP! &c Tapper7.com, ssstudios and lonely faction productions*/
package gcd;
public class Gcd{
public static int gcd(int a,int b){
int t;
while(b!=0){
t = b;
b = a%b;
a = t;
}
return a;
}//end fxn gcd
public static int lcm(int x, int y){
return(x*y/gcd(x,y));
}//end fxn lcm
public static void main(String[] args){
int lcm1 = 0; //will store the lcm of parameter 2 & 3
int lcm2 = 0; //will store the result of lcm(p1, lcm(p2,p3))
int p1 = 3;
int p2 = 5;
int p3 = 7;
lcm1 = lcm(p2,p3);
lcm2 = lcm(lcm1, p1);
System.out.println("The least common multiple of " +p1+ ", " + p2 + ", "
+p3+ " is " +lcm2);
}//end mn
}//end gcd/lcm class tester

here is the result:

run:
The least common multiple of 3, 5, 7 is 105
BUILD SUCCESSFUL (total time: 0 seconds)

therefore, Barnes is correct. Thank you for pointing out my foible and giving a chance to review & test this classic algorithm. I just set up an entirely new IDE on an entirely new system so this made for great QC on the new devkit & system too.

A Die Class that implements Crap…I mean ‘Craps’ in Java ….

I took a step back from cards and decks to see if I could design and build a crap game using some object-oriented design. To play the game, we roll two die. The result is determined by the sum of the two rolls….a number between two and 12. Put simply, seven and 11 means the roller “won,” any other result is some form of push or loss…”snake eyes [2]” and “box cars[12]” usually equate to a bust. We can make up specific rules when we implement the game itself, or change them on the fly. The key concept here the abstract data type I built – Class Die.

Lets think about what a die IS and what it DOES. In computer science terms, we’re going to build a virtual die based on my observation/interpretation of these aspects of this object. For a game of craps, I’m concerned with the die’s current status, that is, what is face up on this hypothetical die right now? What is face up if I create a new one out of thin air? What is face up after I roll it? Compared to a Card, a Die object is relatively simple. While a card has a suit and rank, a die only has a face value. The important thing to consider is that when we roll it, one, two, three, four, five and six should occur with a relatively even distribution – as close to random as we can get. How we determine a random number in this range, how we determine that a computer-generated number is “random” at all is beyond the scope of this discussion; for now …assume that the Java Virtual Machine can in fact do this. We can create another program later to test it, say… a million times and see how evenly the JVM can emulate randomness.

Here are the “body parts” of the Die I created – “face up” I used an integer and called it “state”…to create a new Die I initialized it to have one be face up. Since I need to read the face, I created a “print state” method. Of course, a “roll” method was created — which will change the state (or not! 1/6th of the time….) I also buiis lt a function that will immediately return the current state (to whatever interface needs to use it) as an integer; this is fast and useful once an actual game using dice is built – common coding standards would ask that we call this a “get[State]”
There are probably a few other things a die has and does, in fact, we should have an ability to put the “state” where we want it; a “set” procedure…in terms of the game; this would presumably be some sort of cheating, so we left it out. For now…anyway here is the abstract data type:

package die;
import java.lang.Math;
import java.util.*;
//this is a WIP!!
public class Die{
int state;
public Die(){
state = 1;
}
public void printstate(){
System.out.println(state + " is face up");
}
public int roll(){
int a;
Random roll = new Random();
a = 1+Math.abs(roll.nextInt()%6);
state = a;
return a;
}
public int getstate(){
return state;
}
}//end Die

The way I built this, a main program will have to create two instances of “Die,” roll them, determine a sum and evaluate/output the result. The class above neatly and concisely provides everything we need to play the game. In the code we will create dice using a statement like this- “Die the1st = new Die();” Let’s take a look at what happens when this line is executed.
the = or assignment operator will move from right to left…so the 1st thing that happens is the cpu allocates memory for it (which shouldn’t cost much more than the memory needed to store one integer 16…perhaps 32 bits (???)…the “new” keyword also pulls the constructor method seen above, which will initialize it to have “one” be “face up” …in the class above — Die(){state=1;}

Then we will create a second die, everything I just said will happen again. In the game, we’re gonna roll ’em and figure out what happens. As we build the main class, we will use printState() and getState() frequently to verify that our dice are behaving like we would expect real dice to. Remember, we are creating them in a strictly abstract sense, we can’t hold them, look at them or actually roll them…so we need to poke and prod at these dice as the game goes … debugging the code if anything out-of-the-ordinary happens.

Later we will take a look at the entire source code; for now lets consider some key moments in a single round of craps. The player rolls, he either wins or loses, so we start by calculating the sum.

mydie.roll();
mydie1.roll();
sum = mydie.getstate()+mydie1.getstate();

The above sum tells us what happened. I added a Boolean method to the Die class to determine victory and a branching-if-then-else method to print what happened …

//this is in the main class
currentstack = currentstack - betamt;
if(won(sum)){
System.out.print(" WINNER ");
currentstack*=3;
}
else if(sum==2 || sum == 12){
System.out.print(" OUCH!! ");
currentstack=0;
bust = true;
}
else{System.out.print(" LOSER ");}

Don’t worry too much about the specifics; it should be easy enough to see that, in pseudocode

SUBTRACT the players bank by how much they BET
IF the player WON
MAKE Notification, increase their money
ELSE the player LOST
IF the player rolled SNAKE EYES or BOXCARS
Make Notification, player BUST
IF the player rolled some other value
Make Notification, reduce their money

The rules I used are arbitrary, essentially we want something good to happen if the roll a seven or 11, something bad to happen if not…and something REALLY BAD to happen if they roll a two or 12. As it is set right now, “snake eyes” or “box cars” leads to player bust- in this case they lose everything and the game is over. Winning triples their money, as written and the game continues provided the player has more than $1 to play with. I’ve yet to decide exactly what happens, but really it doesn’t matter. The design allows for any rules regarding what you get if you win, what you don’t get if you lose, how badly you can lose, if/when the player can choose to quit and if/when the cpu will decide to end the game.
the class method “won” is fairly straightforward. TRUE will be sent back if the condition is met.

public static boolean won(int s){
return(s==7||s==11);
}

In the next installment, I will decide on some actual rules, show some sample outputs of the game in progress along with some research to see if the Java Virtual Machine is, in fact, emulating the rolling of two die by writing a special use-case in which we’ll roll each die a million times and see how normalized the randomness really is.

Let’s play…I mean…create a prototype ’13’ deck aka Korean Poker!

If you are like me you played this addictive game at lunch, on the bus, during class…whatever you played it constantly because it’s seriously fun and a great way to pass the time. At Capo Valley, we loved this game because it was winnable even if you were dealt a shitty hand, the game encouraged a great deal of shit-talking and merriment. We’d also enhanced it with “insult rules” such as, while dealing, you throw a few of them face-up, just to piss off whoever you want to piss off. It also lended itself to so much cheating that we overlayed a rule; “If no one saw it, it wasn’t cheating.” Technically that is true in the absolute…the difference is that we encouraged cheating because it added more layers of fun, strategy, dexterity, options to win…the perfect game for college-prep band geeks who think to much and are fiercely competitive.

Common ways to cheat when you re the dealer is place a card you want on the bottom of the deck, dealing, 13 cards to each player beginning with west, you get the final card. Desirable cards include the 3 of clubs (whomever holds this card goes 1st…it is much like other games where whomever runs out 1st wins, going 1st on a good hand could end it). The ace of hearts is valued – any run ending in this card is unbeatable (thus you get to go again). Likewise, the 2 of hearts is valued for being the highest card – it is not unbeatable (a two-killer is a double-run-of-three such as 4,4,5,5,6,6) but it’s always nice to have, especially late in the game when most pairs and runs are likely to be all down. Another great way to cheat it to simply hide a card (or two, or more…) wherever you can hide it. The best place seemed to be under the left thigh or up my right sleeve. Another “layered” rule is that if you are caught cheating you forfeit the game (and winning if gambling is involved) – simply trying to look at other people’s cards is another surprisingly easy way cheat.

I won’t waste time with any more specific rules…most of you have never played it…still, the f-ed up ways to mess with the game applies to all of them (and that only scratches the surface) and you can apply the tenets and ideas in this post to YOUR preferred card game.

On topic – I’ve been brushing up on mu Java programming again so as a thought experiment I began to build a “Card” class (ADT, data-type, etc). Once I got that to work I decided to test it by creating an array (a list) of them and ordering them in the exact order they would go in 13. On higher level of this project are the following:

  1. A Deck Class
  2. A 13 Class
  3. A user-interface for the game itself

For now, I simply used my Card data-type to see if I could use a nested-for loop to populate the deck with cards as they from low to high in the game of 13. Software Engineers know that regardless of language, arrays begin at zero. In an object-oriented mode, I decided that “zero” had so little to do with cards/decks/card-games that I would use a place-holder for it. What else is not used…I mean…in actual card games? For most; the Joker(s), so in the interest of something w/in striking distance of elegant design; (in pseuodocode) 0=(string)”joker”
The following is the output from a Deck prototype, which hints at an actual 13 prototype, which is a thought rxp[eriment for the future…particularly the design of three players who can strategize against me…and..on an absurd level of abstraction…try to cheat me if the opportunity comes up and allow me to cheat the non-player-characters.

Below is the successful output from the v0 prototype of a 13-Deck
run:
whomever gets the 3 of spades goes first.
The following list will create a deck of 52 cards in ’13’ order
1. created the 3 of spades
2. created the 3 of clubs
3. created the 3 of diamonds
4. created the 3 of hearts
5. created the 4 of spades
6. created the 4 of clubs
7. created the 4 of diamonds
8. created the 4 of hearts
9. created the 5 of spades
10. created the 5 of clubs
11. created the 5 of diamonds
12. created the 5 of hearts
13. created the 6 of spades
14. created the 6 of clubs
15. created the 6 of diamonds
16. created the 6 of hearts
17. created the 7 of spades
18. created the 7 of clubs
19. created the 7 of diamonds
20. created the 7 of hearts
21. created the 8 of spades
22. created the 8 of clubs
23. created the 8 of diamonds
24. created the 8 of hearts
25. created the 9 of spades
26. created the 9 of clubs
27. created the 9 of diamonds
28. created the 9 of hearts
29. created the 10 of spades
30. created the 10 of clubs
31. created the 10 of diamonds
32. created the 10 of hearts
33. created the J of spades
34. created the J of clubs
35. created the J of diamonds
36. created the J of hearts
37. created the Q of spades
38. created the Q of clubs
39. created the Q of diamonds
40. created the Q of hearts
41. created the K of spades
42. created the K of clubs
43. created the K of diamonds
44. created the K of hearts
45. created the A of spades
46. created the A of clubs
47. created the A of diamonds
48. created the A of hearts
49. created the 2 of spades
50. created the 2 of clubs
51. created the 2 of diamonds
52. created the 2 of hearts
*QA test* The highest ranking card in 13 is the 2 of hearts
BUILD SUCCESSFUL (total time: 0 seconds)

It works! Created using the Netbeans IDE 8.0.2 on a win8.1 box using the Java SE 8 or Java 1.8 as I call it. SRC follows:

package card;
/** WIP - create a card ADT and enumerate it into a deck
* per "13" rules aka Korean Poker
* @author Tapper7.com last stable build - 12/15 &c ssstudios, los angeles, ca
*/
public class Card{
int suit;
int rank;
Card(){
this.suit = 0;
this.rank = 0;
}//null constr
Card(int suit, int rank){
this.suit = suit;
this.rank = rank;
}//fully-formed constructor to be used when a new card is instantiated
public static void showCard(Card theCard){
//cards are ranked as they are in 13 aka korean poker
//"jokers" hold null memory space so we arent using zeroes
String[] s = {"joker", "spades", "clubs", "diamonds", "hearts"};
String[] r = {"joker", "3", "4", "5", "6", "7", "8",
"9", "10", "J", "Q", "K", "A", "2"};
System.out.println(r[theCard.rank] + " of " + s[theCard.suit]);
}

public static void main(String[] args){
//create an array of cards
Card[] mydeck = new Card[54]; //array is oversized for debug
mydeck[0] = new Card(1,1);       //initialize
//test that the lowest card is created correctly
System.out.print(“whomever gets the “);
Card.showCard(mydeck[0]);
System.out.println(“goes first.”);
//populate the 13 deck in order fro m low to high
int currentCard = 1;
int suits = 1;
int ranks = 1;
System.out.println(“The following list will create a deck of 52 cards in ’13’ order”);
for(ranks = 1; ranks < 14; ranks++){//outerloop the ranks from 3 to 2
for(suits = 1; suits < 5; suits++){
mydeck[currentCard] = new Card(suits, ranks);
System.out.print(currentCard+”. “);
System.out.print(” created the “);
Card.showCard(mydeck[currentCard]);
currentCard++; //increment deck position
}//end inner loop
}//end outer loop
//test that the algorithm put the highest card in the correct index:
System.out.print(“*QA test* The highest ranking card in 13 is the “);
Card.showCard(mydeck[52]);
}//end mn
}//end prototype
thanks for stopping by! and now [below], a word form one of our sponsors

fb compatibility test….

a picture of paris at dawn or dusk with the words hashtag pray for paris inscribed over the skyline and signed by chris welke

as we cycle through the changes to style and funtion; dear reader; I wanted to share with you an editorial I piced together in the immediate aftermath of the tragedies in Paris. I snapped 15-odd shots from around social media to show how quickly/disturbingly hateful invective against Muslims was growing. At the moment I put this commentary together and shared it on fb; HATE itself was going viral. My intent was alert my “real-life” friends…ask them to keep an opn mind that they not fall prey to the fear-mongering, hate-mongering, monger-mongering…u get the idea. as much as “dislike” (note — didn’t take bait to be hypocrite and say I “hate” fb; even though technically I do and technically that’s ok w/ this writer morally because fb is a corporate-adevertising-agency-subdivision-og-google-and-not-a-person;….there ok to hate fb) Facebook, I like the way they package prose that has a great deal of pics to illustrate it.

What i’m getting at is…as long as we are “under-construction” I will audit my privacy level on fb, so how well MY fb page can communicate to you VIA The SoCal Picayune…and as always, give the “handshake” between my fb & my wp a check-up.

<h2>wp post: fb–we’re going start with the usual checkup, just cough while I put my finger here…

your browser: *coughs* link to post that may or may not be public–coughing from

“fb Chris Welke #9” aka /facebook.com/chris.welke.9/* TEST!

Coughing TO: you@your_ip using your device, os & browser.

prediction – you will not be able to read (10/18) due to privacy setting on fb

WIP – find a way to embed or mimck a fb “story” of this nature in WP & || customize privacy setting to make stories initially written in fb jive with the site, so there is no rework when creative energy strikes, news breaks, or both</h2>

Ok my browser says you are using an older-model desktop PC, so go back to work dummy! This site is #nsfw, labeled “mature” in the meta-data and contains graphic depictions of truth; reality and (God forgive me) the above FB post; once you are able to read it; is political in nature. You’v beean warned 😉 –ed []

below is a test of another “mobile-freindly” multi-media-enabled advert, this once


More Computer Graphics Artwork rendered in Java – Spirals and Variable Crosshatching….

Square Spiral SRC. I will include two ways to view the source code (since WP doesn’t get along with formatted code all that well….)
Below, 4 snapshots posted as jpegs. (it will stay posted it it looks ok)….

At bottom, a far more practical link using my new XML/WP “do it your own way, upload and forget about it” or whatever it is I called that.
Unfortunately, these files can only appear w/in posts as links…any code is subject to all the PHP/CSS/JS hard-wired into most WP themes. I have modified this theme so heavily I could no longer tell you who wrote it. I don’t credit the original author as I only used his code as a template; this not a child-theme…this is The Socal Picayune 2015 WP Theme by Chris Welke.
My Easy/XML to WP system is brand-new …expect improvements!

The featured artwork is a far less complicated algorithm compared with previously-posted recursive “Circle Splatters” and my Recursive “Impressionist” forest I entitled “June Gloom” …still to come on this topic is a 3D fractal terrain map implemented recursively using triangles and a “random” number generator. That’s how they created a whole planet for Captain Kirk to fly over in Star Trek II. (This was the first commercial application of the Diamond-Square Algoritm” which will make sense to anyone with a general knowledge of Euclidean geometry, but put them in the lab and ask them to implement it in Java3D or OpenGL and they MAY go “shit nuts” as I initaillay did 11 years ago when it was a CSC 407 assignment. I had to take an F because I never solved it. My lab partner on the other hand, solved/implemented AND added color-coded elevation for Extra Credit.
spiral code 1spiral code2spiral code3spiral code4

Sometimes, really smart people make me feel really dumb.

More fun with Java 1.8 -ASCII “Art” 101 using Arrays….

This is the type of assignment I would hand out to first year programming students. After introducing the idea of lists, I implore them to solve the following:
Use a list to build an ASCII pyramid using the character of your choice and make it: a) appear “pyramidal” that is, no leaning, no right-angles at the base and give it some semblance of aesthetic quality b) your logic should generate EVERY level of the pyramid, that is, no coding “special cases” for the top, middle or bottom rows. The logic must hold sound to construct the entire pyramid as a stand-alone algorithm. c) print your src (source code) and the output of your program to prove to peers that it works.

    This task requires careful dissection of the elements involved:

  • variable number of rows
  • each row knows how many spaces to print and how many characters
  • this involves logical analysis for the left spaces, the chars AND the right spaces
  • The algorithm must know when to “endline”/”newline”/
  • Careful analysis and monitoring (QA/QC) of the variables during runtime may be needed

For the seasoned programmer this is fairly basic, but involves core mathematical concepts, an element of basic aesthetic design and a good grip on list variable storage; how they are both computed and sent to an output stream (System.out in this case) This is the rough equivalent of “cout <<” for you C/C++ guys

    For extra credit:

  • Add a user-interface to ask the user how big to build the pyramid. Include exception-handling for pyramid sizes that are not technically “pyramids” (height = 1 is not a pyramid) heights too large will lose their aesthetic, or their pyramidal structure entirely if built too large or too impractical for the user’s display. (I capped mine at 50 rows) – add warnings depending on the user interface).
  • Decorate the pyramid with one or more random characters in addition to your “foundation” block (I used hashtags for my foundation block).
  • Invert the pyramid.
  • Stack the pyramid atop the inverted one to make a diamond shape…make sure it lines up evenly. No bumps or other strangeness in the middle.

Here is a sample solution; note that I carefully tracked line size, space, building-block-count, row-count & the storage of each…this is crucial to accuracy and QC testing during development time.
This is an acceptable output:

a snap of the pyramid program in-process using the Netbeans IDE
seen w/in the Netbeans Integrated Development Environment. “I design them.”

 

Here is the source code – note brevity in my solution– ~20 lines-ungolfed!:
/*
author: Chris "Tapper" Welke
This program generates an ASCII-art 50 row pyramid using hashtags as a building block.
Solution provided for instructional/informational purposes in the areas of lists,
integers, type-casting, dynamic memory allocation, and open-source programming. If you
are new to Java, this is an excellent trial pgm to get you started.
Dist. under the GNU Public License. Free to distribute: please attribute though, ok?:
Last Stable Build: 5/23/15 at Tapper7.com and Self-Similarity Studios courtesy
The Netbeans (Netbeans.org) IDE, Java 1.8 and the std. javac compiler
OS: Win 8.1, Chipset by Intel. Laptop by Hewlett-Packard. Website provided by Media Temple
*/
package learn;
import java.util.Arrays;
public class HashTagASCIIPyramid{
protected static int charlinelength = 100;
public static void main(String[] arg){
float[] asciiStorage = new float[HashTagASCIIPyramid.charlinelength];
int totalHashtags = 1; //initialize builing block total
int charCount = 0; //count building blocks for QC testing
int[] cclist = new int[100]; //record the char generation as it happens
int leftspaces = (int)asciiStorage.length/2;
int rightspaces = (int)asciiStorage.length/2;
int height = 1;
for(int i = 0; i < asciiStorage.length/2; i++){
for (int l = 0; l < leftspaces; l++){
System.out.print(" "); charCount++;
}
for (int t = 0; t < totalHashtags; t++){
System.out.print("#"); charCount++;
}
for (int r = 0; r < rightspaces; r++){
System.out.print(" "); charCount++;
}
System.out.print('\n');
/*QC Tracking: height++; cclist[i] = charCount;*/
leftspaces--; totalHashtags +=2;rightspaces--;
}//end mn loop
}//end mn
}//end class #asciipyramid

Hints: I used space-fillers for the spaces (” “); – left and right brackets plus lots of variable outputs to see what was going on during run-time, my initial design yielded the following output:
run:
pyramid test1
WHOOPS!
Heh…so clearly there were multiple logic faults, (and I started with tildas, not hashtags….) but it was easy to track the movement of the left and right brackets that debugged the left and right SPACES and not shown are my debugging outputs that checked the length of each row for consistency(it was going over and under 100 – keeping the length of each row equivalent was key to my particular legitimate solution)— also that my iterators and arrays were misplaced and thus not controlling and the output correctly.

    Keys to victory:

  1. increment blocks by TWO; not one
  2. decrement spaces and increment blocks OUTSIDE the main loop rightSpaces--;leftSpaces--totalHashtags+=2;

Coming soon: Bill’s adventures at Los Alamos, More Netbeans experiments, tutorials and anything interesting that happens when I have my camera on me.

Lots of great ideas in the works…and let us not forget: Summer is Coming …. Go Santa Clara and Concord! Support your local drum corps by playing bingo, going to shows, donating your time, tailgating at shows and screaming your lungs out when corps brings you to it on the Field of Honor. All signs point to a another stellar season for Red and Blue Banners both; and I wouldn’t have it any other way (scratch that….I’d resurrect Bridgemen, Suncoast, Big 27, Star, Kingsmen, The Freelancers and The Velvet Knights) THEN it’d be roll-out time.
Under the circumstances, putting all politics aside; Thank God for Rosemont, Rockford, Madison, Garfield, Bloooooo, SCV/BD, Cru, Spirit and all other remamining “Big Time DCI” corps still in the hunt, still rockin’ it…gettin ready for the only kickoff I really care about: Memorial Day Weekend. A trial by fire where those who make it through will be ready for the best summer of their lives. Hang in there kids, you got this!
Music, Tech, Art, Love and Life; find it all right here at The SoCal Picayune. Your LA/OC home for Drum Corps, Culture, tech-security, experiments and solutions, the occasional off-color joke, scam-hunting, YT highlights and the best (and worst) direct from the minds of this writer, Tapper and Bill Feynman.
Maybe a Memorial Day Anecdote will inspire itself as we begin the approach. hmmmmm…..
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