Embed Tapcast via iTunes INTO The Socal Picayune? Technical testing time DING DING!….

So in order to promote my new podcast, so far I can only give search terms on SM….which is way lame, but lots are listening to my prototype level content either organically or because they YOU are reader and have a twisted sense of what qualifies as entertainment (actually you are likely to have a higher education and IQ than 90 % of the public per my analytics analysis aggregation)

SO!force you to search for “Tapcast” on iTunes or 1 mouse click? as software engineer I go with latter. Fast, ez & SIMPLE. No work should be involved to be informed and entertained by the madhouse that is Self-Similarity Studios.
TESTING…..take 1: Apple’s iTunes “Linkmaker”

Below should feature a button so you can “get some” I mean “get it on iTunes” ….

I’ll even allow the Apple branding if it works….
Here are the some of the new transcription arrangements NOT included in the cast….
Testing…”Salvation is Created” adapted from an arrangement by Greg Flores….
Salvation is Created arr. Tapper by Tapper7
*EDIT – Aerith’s theme removed from embedding due to Musescore’s limit of 5 scores, I will repost it on iTunes as “music only” and perhaps a pdf or two here.
*
Relm and Aerith’s Theme were composed by Nobuo Uematsu on behalf of SquareSoft for FF3 on the SNES and FFVII on the PS1, respectively. You can currently order FFVII via Steam if you can’t wait for the remake. As for FF3 (FF6 in Japan), sans a cartridge and console, I recommend snes9x provided you DID purchase the game legitimately when you were a kid. As for Hayes I love that track but f-him na…I thought that guy was cool.

Throw “4chan raids on twitch” into a search if you are bored and in need of laughter. Join up, but after my first, EPIC “Ramoning” of a creepy cosplay guy to entertain the 4channers, 9gaggers, myself and make they annoying anime guy lose his mind…I’m suspended for 24 hours. Next time I’ll record so I can resurrect “Steve from Yellowstone” I wish I’d been recording the livestream. I honestly think Jim and Op wouldve given me an atta boy. Last nights raid on The guest host of Black Ops 3 was beyond epic. Caution; cringe-humor is not for everyone. The running gag was “Bush did 9/11” simply because it made the host lose his mind. Full-blown mental breakdown on camera. Never realized we had FULL CONTROL of his livestream and that none of the donations were real.

Infotainment you won’t hear anywhere else dear reader: The SoCal Picayune.

XML test v7 – Override all PHP, CSS and .js | populate a WP page with custom XML. Success!

click here to view an outline in XML format. PHP 5 offers an @Override for all plugins and theme/css hard-wired to every WP install. It generates a blank pallete with a few simple commands (in PHP) that disable all my adds, stylesheets “background shit” that WP infrastructure. WP is great but if I cannot post a simple outline for instructional purposes, what good is it? Most plugins are incompatible with WP v4.2. This will come up as clickable link, I have yet to decipher a system to embedd pure XML into a post or page manually…if you click on this link you will see that code I wrote does just that…just not on THIS page. So I’m zeroin in on a solution to override all Javascript, PHP, CSS and whatver else is in the backbone of WP in order to display custom XML pages (and html, shtml….) w/o getting tied into the complexity of all my ads and style, media, calls to YT databases and other multimedia content that loads on the main page. Ideally this Copy Editing 101 tutorial should load in <1second. On avg. it take 6-9 second to load the main site.

The other goal is to post code or pictures of say…an educational outline by coding as opposed to taking a snapshot of the XML, saving it as a jpeg and posting it here as picture. That is functional workaround, but I don’t like it.

An allegedly properly-configured XML file for iTunes Podcasting….

version 3 of the image file created for iTunes/Apple 'requirements'

Ok, Here we go (at present I care more about getting Apple to publish the two test episodes I made than getting anyone to listen) First, the tech; then I’ll try to bring the funny. If it works, I’m technically “ON THE AIR” again so let’s do this yo! Less typy more talkyrssfeedxml
The above XML was generated in WordPress v4.2.2 on 5/31/15 by Chris Welke @Self-Similarity Studios and Tapper7.com, Los Angeles, CA. It is provided for informational purposes and this writer hopes it will assist others in the needlessly convoluted world of podcasts.
Third-party compliance validation :

RSS feed i/o  test. CHECK! Kids.... Always perform QA/QC compliance testing on anything made for public consumption
RSS feed i/o test. CHECK! Kids….
Always perform QA/QC compliance testing on anything made for public consumption

Stitcher Test

More fun with Java 1.8 -ASCII “Art” 101 using Arrays….

This is the type of assignment I would hand out to first year programming students. After introducing the idea of lists, I implore them to solve the following:
Use a list to build an ASCII pyramid using the character of your choice and make it: a) appear “pyramidal” that is, no leaning, no right-angles at the base and give it some semblance of aesthetic quality b) your logic should generate EVERY level of the pyramid, that is, no coding “special cases” for the top, middle or bottom rows. The logic must hold sound to construct the entire pyramid as a stand-alone algorithm. c) print your src (source code) and the output of your program to prove to peers that it works.

    This task requires careful dissection of the elements involved:

  • variable number of rows
  • each row knows how many spaces to print and how many characters
  • this involves logical analysis for the left spaces, the chars AND the right spaces
  • The algorithm must know when to “endline”/”newline”/
  • Careful analysis and monitoring (QA/QC) of the variables during runtime may be needed

For the seasoned programmer this is fairly basic, but involves core mathematical concepts, an element of basic aesthetic design and a good grip on list variable storage; how they are both computed and sent to an output stream (System.out in this case) This is the rough equivalent of “cout <<” for you C/C++ guys

    For extra credit:

  • Add a user-interface to ask the user how big to build the pyramid. Include exception-handling for pyramid sizes that are not technically “pyramids” (height = 1 is not a pyramid) heights too large will lose their aesthetic, or their pyramidal structure entirely if built too large or too impractical for the user’s display. (I capped mine at 50 rows) – add warnings depending on the user interface).
  • Decorate the pyramid with one or more random characters in addition to your “foundation” block (I used hashtags for my foundation block).
  • Invert the pyramid.
  • Stack the pyramid atop the inverted one to make a diamond shape…make sure it lines up evenly. No bumps or other strangeness in the middle.

Here is a sample solution; note that I carefully tracked line size, space, building-block-count, row-count & the storage of each…this is crucial to accuracy and QC testing during development time.
This is an acceptable output:

a snap of the pyramid program in-process using the Netbeans IDE
seen w/in the Netbeans Integrated Development Environment. “I design them.”

 

Here is the source code – note brevity in my solution– ~20 lines-ungolfed!:
/*
author: Chris "Tapper" Welke
This program generates an ASCII-art 50 row pyramid using hashtags as a building block.
Solution provided for instructional/informational purposes in the areas of lists,
integers, type-casting, dynamic memory allocation, and open-source programming. If you
are new to Java, this is an excellent trial pgm to get you started.
Dist. under the GNU Public License. Free to distribute: please attribute though, ok?:
Last Stable Build: 5/23/15 at Tapper7.com and Self-Similarity Studios courtesy
The Netbeans (Netbeans.org) IDE, Java 1.8 and the std. javac compiler
OS: Win 8.1, Chipset by Intel. Laptop by Hewlett-Packard. Website provided by Media Temple
*/
package learn;
import java.util.Arrays;
public class HashTagASCIIPyramid{
protected static int charlinelength = 100;
public static void main(String[] arg){
float[] asciiStorage = new float[HashTagASCIIPyramid.charlinelength];
int totalHashtags = 1; //initialize builing block total
int charCount = 0; //count building blocks for QC testing
int[] cclist = new int[100]; //record the char generation as it happens
int leftspaces = (int)asciiStorage.length/2;
int rightspaces = (int)asciiStorage.length/2;
int height = 1;
for(int i = 0; i < asciiStorage.length/2; i++){
for (int l = 0; l < leftspaces; l++){
System.out.print(" "); charCount++;
}
for (int t = 0; t < totalHashtags; t++){
System.out.print("#"); charCount++;
}
for (int r = 0; r < rightspaces; r++){
System.out.print(" "); charCount++;
}
System.out.print('\n');
/*QC Tracking: height++; cclist[i] = charCount;*/
leftspaces--; totalHashtags +=2;rightspaces--;
}//end mn loop
}//end mn
}//end class #asciipyramid

Hints: I used space-fillers for the spaces (” “); – left and right brackets plus lots of variable outputs to see what was going on during run-time, my initial design yielded the following output:
run:
pyramid test1
WHOOPS!
Heh…so clearly there were multiple logic faults, (and I started with tildas, not hashtags….) but it was easy to track the movement of the left and right brackets that debugged the left and right SPACES and not shown are my debugging outputs that checked the length of each row for consistency(it was going over and under 100 – keeping the length of each row equivalent was key to my particular legitimate solution)— also that my iterators and arrays were misplaced and thus not controlling and the output correctly.

    Keys to victory:

  1. increment blocks by TWO; not one
  2. decrement spaces and increment blocks OUTSIDE the main loop rightSpaces--;leftSpaces--totalHashtags+=2;

Coming soon: Bill’s adventures at Los Alamos, More Netbeans experiments, tutorials and anything interesting that happens when I have my camera on me.

Lots of great ideas in the works…and let us not forget: Summer is Coming …. Go Santa Clara and Concord! Support your local drum corps by playing bingo, going to shows, donating your time, tailgating at shows and screaming your lungs out when corps brings you to it on the Field of Honor. All signs point to a another stellar season for Red and Blue Banners both; and I wouldn’t have it any other way (scratch that….I’d resurrect Bridgemen, Suncoast, Big 27, Star, Kingsmen, The Freelancers and The Velvet Knights) THEN it’d be roll-out time.
Under the circumstances, putting all politics aside; Thank God for Rosemont, Rockford, Madison, Garfield, Bloooooo, SCV/BD, Cru, Spirit and all other remamining “Big Time DCI” corps still in the hunt, still rockin’ it…gettin ready for the only kickoff I really care about: Memorial Day Weekend. A trial by fire where those who make it through will be ready for the best summer of their lives. Hang in there kids, you got this!
Music, Tech, Art, Love and Life; find it all right here at The SoCal Picayune. Your LA/OC home for Drum Corps, Culture, tech-security, experiments and solutions, the occasional off-color joke, scam-hunting, YT highlights and the best (and worst) direct from the minds of this writer, Tapper and Bill Feynman.
Maybe a Memorial Day Anecdote will inspire itself as we begin the approach. hmmmmm…..
[] Support my sponsors! All are reviewed regularly for legitimacy by the Senior Ethics Auditor: moi

The Binary Power Series and Java 1.8 ….

A numeric depiction of 18.44 Quintillion

Series follow a specific pattern and obey explicit, ineffable rules, like prime numbers….
1, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23…. Or a times-table such as 9…. 18, 27, 36, 45, 54, 63, 72, 81, 90, 99. You get the idea, right? (I hope so or you’ll find this post incredibly boring).
Computers store information in bits. A bit is one memory cell that is known by the CPU to be TRUE or FALSE, one or zero. In the parlance of electrical engineering, this equates to either “very very low voltage” or “hardly any voltage at all.”
A byte is eight bits: 0000 0000 thru 1111 1111; 1-256

Consider 0000, 0001, 0010, 0011, 0100, 0101, 0111, 1111 -OR- (in English) one, two, three, four five six, seven, eight. To be literal, it’s actually zero through seven, but let’s not get muddy the waters or scare off any readers due to the “maths.” You don’t need to know much math to understand this information…. So a computer needs half of one byte in order to express “seven” to the world “1111.”

Eight bits comprises two to the eighth power (256) possible binary combos. That’s enough to create a color palette acceptable to the human eye, In RGB-space, three eight-bit numbers (0,0,0) being “K” or Black and (255,255,255) being White – or is it vice-versa? You can always go to www.org for quick reference on non-abstract, “code flavors” such as the above assertion. Ok, so three SETs of 256 bits can broadcast “Game of Thrones” on your laptop screen adequaetely. This is what makes 64-bit machines so exciting…64 is a small number….2^64 (which is the definition of a 64-bit sys) ACTUALLY equals about 18.5 QUINTILLION, or 18.5 x a trillion x a trillion. To give you an idea of size…if you started counting as fast as you could from the time you could speak…or comprehend it and count in your head; if you lived an avg. lifespan (~72.9 yrs) you’d be spitting out “one billion” with your last dying breath. A 64-bit system can express and count to a billion in fractions of a millisecond. So what concerns us about this TODAY?
With big data (all the rage) comes big numbers, so I’ve been thinking about them and toying with the limits of large number calculation and output using my laptop’s on-board calculator…it can express a google correctly using a semi-correct scientific notation: “1.e+100” –by that, Microsoft means to say “a one followed by 100 zeroes.” I have no way of knowing HOW they arrive at a correct answer to 10^100 considering that the largest unsigned long integer that can be stored in one memory cell by a 64-bit system is stated above..”a 1 followed by 19 numbers” … this means the Calculator App you use combines multiple long integers and uses extra memory to store anything above 2^64 = 18,446,744,073,709,551,616.

Using the Netbeans IDE, I created a program that asks the user to provide a number to act as a power of two. It then calculates and prints the subsequent results to the screen. Integers are preffered because they are fast, accurate and take up very little memory: 16 bits or 2 bytes, which can express numbers on the range of (-32678 to +32678). Integers (or “ints”) can ONLY BE WHOLE NUMBERS, that is, 1.5 is not an int, nor is e or pie or the square root of two.

Program output for common cases:
How many iterations of the Binary Power Series would you like to see calculated and printed?
0
Ok - you're the boss. No iterations--> no output
How many iterations of the Binary Power Series would you like to see calculated and printed?
1
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 0 = 1
BUILD SUCCESSFUL (total time: 6 seconds)
How many iterations of the Binary Power Series would you like to see calculated and printed?
2
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 0 = 1
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 1 = 2
BUILD SUCCESSFUL (total time: 4 seconds)
How many iterations of the Binary Power Series would you like to see calculated and printed?
4
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 0 = 1
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 1 = 2
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 2 = 4
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 3 = 8
BUILD SUCCESSFUL (total time: 6 seconds)
How many iterations of the Binary Power Series would you like to see calculated and printed?
8
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 0 = 1
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 1 = 2
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 2 = 4
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 3 = 8
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 4 = 16
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 5 = 32
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 6 = 64
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 7 = 128
BUILD SUCCESSFUL (total time: 15 seconds)

How many iterations of the Binary Power Series would you like to see calculated and printed?
16
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 0 = 1
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 1 = 2
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 2 = 4
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 3 = 8
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 4 = 16
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 5 = 32
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 6 = 64
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 7 = 128
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 8 = 256
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 9 = 512
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 10 = 1024
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 11 = 2048
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 12 = 4096
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 13 = 8192
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 14 = 16384
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 15 = 32768
BUILD SUCCESSFUL (total time: 3 seconds)
How many iterations of the Binary Power Series would you like to see calculated and printed?
32
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 0 = 1
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 1 = 2
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 2 = 4
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 3 = 8
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 4 = 16
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 5 = 32
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 6 = 64
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 7 = 128
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 8 = 256
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 9 = 512
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 10 = 1024
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 11 = 2048
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 12 = 4096
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 13 = 8192
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 14 = 16384
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 15 = 32768
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 16 = 65536
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 17 = 131072
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 18 = 262144
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 19 = 524288
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 20 = 1048576
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 21 = 2097152
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 22 = 4194304
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 23 = 8388608
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 24 = 16777216
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 25 = 33554432
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 26 = 67108864
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 27 = 134217728
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 28 = 268435456
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 29 = 536870912
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 30 = 1073741824
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 31 = 2147483648
BUILD SUCCESSFUL (total time: 4 seconds)

….now let’s see what happens when we get close to 64 iterations:

How many iterations of the Binary Power Series would you like to see calculated and printed?
63
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 0 = 1
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 1 = 2
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 2 = 4
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 3 = 8
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 4 = 16
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 5 = 32
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 6 = 64
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 7 = 128
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 8 = 256
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 9 = 512
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 10 = 1024
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 11 = 2048
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 12 = 4096
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 13 = 8192
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 14 = 16384
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 15 = 32768
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 16 = 65536
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 17 = 131072
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 18 = 262144
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 19 = 524288
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 20 = 1048576
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 21 = 2097152
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 22 = 4194304
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 23 = 8388608
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 24 = 16777216
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 25 = 33554432
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 26 = 67108864
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 27 = 134217728
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 28 = 268435456
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 29 = 536870912
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 30 = 1073741824
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 31 = 2147483648
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 32 = 4294967296
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 33 = 8589934592
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 34 = 17179869184
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 35 = 34359738368
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 36 = 68719476736
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 37 = 137438953472
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 38 = 274877906944
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 39 = 549755813888
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 40 = 1099511627776
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 41 = 2199023255552
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 42 = 4398046511104
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 43 = 8796093022208
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 44 = 17592186044416
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 45 = 35184372088832
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 46 = 70368744177664
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 47 = 140737488355328
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 48 = 281474976710656
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 49 = 562949953421312
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 50 = 1125899906842624
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 51 = 2251799813685248
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 52 = 4503599627370496
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 53 = 9007199254740992
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 54 = 18014398509481984
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 55 = 36028797018963968
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 56 = 72057594037927936
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 57 = 144115188075855872
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 58 = 288230376151711744
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 59 = 576460752303423488
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 60 = 1152921504606846976
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 61 = 2305843009213693952
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 62 = 4611686018427387904

Sixty-four is the borderline on accuracy using unsigned long integers (as stated above) so I coded it’s calculation and warning appropriately:

How many iterations of the Binary Power Series would you like to see calculated and printed?
64
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 0 = 1
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 1 = 2
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 2 = 4
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 3 = 8
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 4 = 16
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 5 = 32
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 6 = 64
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 7 = 128
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 8 = 256
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 9 = 512
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 10 = 1024
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 11 = 2048
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 12 = 4096
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 13 = 8192
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 14 = 16384
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 15 = 32768
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 16 = 65536
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 17 = 131072
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 18 = 262144
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 19 = 524288
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 20 = 1048576
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 21 = 2097152
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 22 = 4194304
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 23 = 8388608
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 24 = 16777216
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 25 = 33554432
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 26 = 67108864
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 27 = 134217728
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 28 = 268435456
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 29 = 536870912
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 30 = 1073741824
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 31 = 2147483648
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 32 = 4294967296
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 33 = 8589934592
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 34 = 17179869184
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 35 = 34359738368
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 36 = 68719476736
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 37 = 137438953472
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 38 = 274877906944
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 39 = 549755813888
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 40 = 1099511627776
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 41 = 2199023255552
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 42 = 4398046511104
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 43 = 8796093022208
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 44 = 17592186044416
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 45 = 35184372088832
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 46 = 70368744177664
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 47 = 140737488355328
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 48 = 281474976710656
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 49 = 562949953421312
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 50 = 1125899906842624
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 51 = 2251799813685248
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 52 = 4503599627370496
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 53 = 9007199254740992
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 54 = 18014398509481984
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 55 = 36028797018963968
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 56 = 72057594037927936
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 57 = 144115188075855872
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 58 = 288230376151711744
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 59 = 576460752303423488
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 60 = 1152921504606846976
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 61 = 2305843009213693952
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 62 = 4611686018427387904
Binary Power Series 2 to the power of 63 = -9223372036854775808
The longest integer that can be expressed correctly is 4611686018427387904
appx. 4.61 QUINTILLION (4.61E18)
***Requests for over 64 iterations return bad data***
BUILD SUCCESSFUL (total time: 3 seconds)

Note that the 64th iteration (array in location 63 is NEGATIVE…this is obviously not the correct answer. I capped the size of the long int array at 65 memory cells, hence …while it WILL compile (using the std gcc compiler) it will throw an exception and kill the program for values OVER 64:
Exception in thread "main" java.lang.ArrayIndexOutOfBoundsException: 65
Here is the source code I wrote if you’d like to try out my logic, tweak it, or scope-out my old-school design style (it is only lightly code-golfed; the abbreviations the kids use today make for confusing code. I try to use Object-Oriented variable identifiers to make definitive and concise use of comments as well as a style I learned from my days as a Cal Poly CSC Code-monkey:

/* Author: Chris "Tapper" Welke
* dist under the GNU Public License.
* This program tests the upper limit of numbers (long ints)
* of the NetBeans IDE v8.0.2 via the rapid geometric growth
* inherent to The Binary Power Series (BPS). 1, 2, 4, 8, 16 ....
* Two to the 64th power is the highest integer in the series
* it can calculate correctly unaided by extra memory/variables/logic
* Last stable build at Self-Similarity Studios & Tapper7.com,
* Los Angeles, CA 5/15/2015
*/
package series;
import java.util.Scanner;
class BPSeries{
protected static String Name = "Binary Power Series ";
protected static int Base = 2;
public static int gIN(){/**
* This fxn gets and sets the number of BPS iterations from the user
* a warning is displayed for n = 64 and an exception is thrown for n > 64
*/
int userInput;
System.out.println("How many iterations of the " + Name + "would you like to see calculated and printed?");
Scanner in = new Scanner(System.in);
userInput = in.nextInt();
return userInput;
}//end UI gIN
public static void main(String[] arg){
//getNset user-defined number of iterations:
int sIts = BPSeries.gIN();
//declare and allocate space for the cells
int cellKit = 65; //throw exception for >64 pwrs of 2
long[] sCells = new long[cellKit];
int pwr = 0; //initialize superscript
int i = 1; //initialize cell iterator
sCells[0] = 0; //null
sCells[1] = 1; //set cell one to 1 since n^0 = 1 for all n
switch(sIts){
case 0:
System.out.println("Ok - you're the boss. No iterations--> no output");
break;
case 1:
System.out.println(BPSeries.Name + BPSeries.Base + " to the power of " +pwr+ " = "+sCells[i]);
i++; pwr++;
break;
default:
System.out.println(BPSeries.Name + BPSeries.Base +" to the power of 0 = 1");
sCells[3]=(sCells[2]*BPSeries.Base);
i++; pwr++;
while (i<=sIts){ sCells[i]= (sCells[i-1] * BPSeries.Base); System.out.println(BPSeries.Name + BPSeries.Base + " to the power of "+pwr+" = "+sCells[i]); i++; pwr++; }//end while if(sIts>63){//exception notification/handling for 64 bit chipset
System.out.println("The longest integer that can be expressed correctly is "+ sCells[63]);
System.out.println("appx. 4.61 QUINTILLION (4.61E18)");
System.out.println("***Requests for over 64 iterations return bad data***");
}//endIF
}//end switch
}//end main
}//end BPS

A graphical analysis and more tests will follow this discussion; as well as highlights from
The Doheny Blues Festival, which begins tomorrow, I will review Boz Scaggs and hopefully Los Lobos too. Come get your tap on w/ me this weekend. Boz Scaggs!!! []

Today’s algorithm and number-musings sponsored by:



*Web Security Notice*

a pic of a black and white (hat) mage pixel rendering from early version of final fantasy

*Internet Security Notice* (Copy of FB post follows):
Dateline – Silicon Valley – and THE WORLD….
To Friends, associates and beloved readers….plz update Java (v1.8u42) when you get a chance….again this is the time when d—–bags will try to get you to update through bogus sites like java32 or 64 or x86 (whatever they are called I will not link to them) Most of you use Chrome which disables most of the security flaws in Java BUT NOT ALL OF THEM. When you have time-update safely: goto java.com
My YT account was compromised YESTERDAY (*sigh again….some “security expert” I am, right?) anyway I changed my Google pswd again I recommend you do the same and find a way to peruse YT WITHOUT logging in, I know this can be annoying but there is another sh—y piece of JavaScript flying around YouTube right now – update 42 should kill it, which is prob. why the good programmers at Java (nee ORACLE) busted out this security update this morning.
As stated in my privacy policy…see the help section of your respective browser (Chrome, Firefox, Safari, …for 95 percent of you) if you wish to disable Java entirely while online. Your user experience will be lowered, sites will load faster, have far less functionality but they WILL be a bit more secure. I recommend getting the update. I posted it above plus links to all Java tools are available [for free] in Column Two of The SoCal Picayune.
That is all – plz update when you have time and as always – get back to work and stop reading my site AT WORK. At least keep the window small (NOT FULL SCREEN) and if you you work in a cubicle farm and DON’T share a cubicle with Ops and MKTG Directors (as I have) just get one of those stick-on rear-view mirrors …you can get ’em at TrueValue Hardware. (TrueValue is an official Tapper-approved Legit business).
Much love; thx for all the support and RT’s on Twitter …all that s—. Love you guys. -t
[]-footer adverts my or may not follow, asynchronous and synchronous .js ads follow:
[test asyn ad]



[test syn ad]