SLOPD, FBI excavating for human remains at Cal Poly….

****for immediate release**** Dateline just above the Muir Dormitory, CPSLO–Three independent cadaver dogs signaled near the Poly “P” …. Part of a longstanding search for Kristin Smart, missing since 1996. The backhoes are at it. The SoCal Pic prays they find something or someone…even if it is not Smart. Keep it tuned here or check out our associated publication The California Register for more….

The California Register *Special Edition* drops….

a shot of the hard copy. The California Register. January 2015. Buster the cadaver-sniffing dog is featured; so is police corruption/laziness and/or incompetence.

….and this writer is responsible for a great deal of the content.


If you did not receive a copy of the edition in your mail or PO Box today…I published a PDF of the prototype below so you can enjoy my words as much as I enjoyed writing them. A full copy of the paper in finalized “ATP” as-is form should be avail. to me soon.
This is not EXACTLY what was printed, but now that it’s out there, here is the editorial as it was initially laid out … the Approved to Print copy is a hair different but my words and are essentially equivalent.
Por Vous: B7 to B8 prototype*
Viva la voce y la pluma libre! The subversive graphic…defacing a Cal Poly “concrete welcome slab” electronically by this writer and published a few months back on this site as dark-satire… (MADE in MSPAINT!) is published as-is in the paper…I admire the chutzpah shown by the publisher of this seriously cool newspaper. His name is David Smallwood and is known as “Pismo Dave” in the Five Cities area.

Por Democracy: viva la marketa libre’! Lee la advert abajo. Gracias!

*CalPoly: Burying the past to protect our future and all pictures and graphics associated with it are the intellectual property of Chris Welke, please obtain permission before sharing/reproducing/copying/printing/etc. Thanks! More to come ASAP. Stay tuned dear reader…and grab your coat cuz it’s gonna be long one. []

On Changing Majors at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo….

A recent search query was shot thru Google …the user was clearly concerned about her child’s decision to change majors at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. Tapper7.com was once again located organically.
As part of a larger project, I’ve written at devastating length and excruciating detail about my life at Cal Poly and Cal Poly itself. I’ve written quite a bit about CHANGING MAJORS at Poly, WHY it is so difficult and why the policy of forcing applicants to declare a major defies logic and is counter-productive.
Point: The initial reason to make changing majors difficult was to prevent an aggie (an Agriculture Student from using his enrolled status to side-step the excruciatingly meticulous process by which Engineering and Architecture students are selected). For instance; dep. on your location, an SAT score of 1000 and a 3.0 GPA with zero extra-curricular activities, zero volunteer work, zero AP classes and no membership in extracurricular clubs, sports, activities or events WOULD QUALIFY for an applicant for The Cal Poly San Luis Obispo College of Agriculture. Perhaps not an acceptance, but certainly a qualify.
This same application to the College of Engineering has a Keyword-binary search algorithm that would keep admissions from even being able to see it, but for arguments sake:

I was accepted to The Cal Poly College of Engineering in 1998. From the viewpoint of a college applicant, Poly was my “reach school,” that is, I applied to five universities, three of which were a “lock” (UCSB, ASU and U of A) one was a “probably” (UC Davis) and now you know what Cal Poly was.
College “counselors” both public and private; informed me of the following regarding Cal Poly:
1. Despite your above average SAT score, your high school career that included multitudes of “advanced” and “college prep” classes, your college-credits already accumulated in the fields of mathematics and music, your mountain of volunteer work and your GPA that fell w/in two-tenths of a 4.0 (aka straight-A’s) You probably won’t get in.
2. You will need to select a major ON THE APPLICATION. If accepted, you will be required to stick with it; Cal Poly makes changing majors extremely difficult. UC schools that permit “Undeclared” are far more desirable to students (such as this writer) who keeps which t-shirt he is going to wear “Undeclared” until moments before leaving the house.
3. Cal Poly’s motto of “Learn by Doing,” is also as “Learn by doing a LOT-CONSTANTLY.”
4. Your ability to survive (that is to not flunk out) of Cal Poly is akin to a coin-toss.
These advisers all “advised” me to drop Poly from my list and add an extra “lock” (SDSU) and/or a “probably” (UCSC).
The 18-year-old Chris Welke was very much like the 35-year-old Chris Welke who writes to you today: he doesn’t care what YOU think and he will go to any length to get what he wants.
In 1998, the same thing was true of Cal Poly as is true today, “U.S. News and World Report” ranks The Cal Poly San Luis Obispo College of Engineering as the #1 Public Engineering College in the West. Choosing a major was but a small hurdle: Good at math? Check. Like video games? Check.
Computer Science. Simple….AMIRITE?
Fifty bucks + one HS transcript + recommendations + etc. et al…were sent to UCSB, Davis, ASU, U of A and Cal Poly San Luis Obispo. I was accepted to all five. The choice to enroll at Poly was (to me) a given. Prestigious, selective, exclusive, far from home but not TOO FAR (~300 miles) and my “tour” of the campus did little but solidify the assumptions and desires of the young and naïve Chris Welke. Nice weather, nice students, nice outfits on nice-looking women….even a friendly freshman who answered all my questions, hung out with me…even showed me where the freshmen dormies go to get loaded – where…. we got loaded of course! As far as my 5 choices were concerned, Poly now had a Mandate. Davis, Santa Barbara had become 3rd party candidates, ASU was my Ralph Nader-desireable but distant and impractical, unlikely, and UofA now had a snowballs chance in…Arizona.
At the time, a cross-product of my GPA, SATs, extra-curriculars, AP scores, volunteerism and college-prep classes/grades would show that among California’s high school students, I was at or above the 98th percentile. This meant (to over-simplify) that I was a better student than 97 percent of California’s “HS Class of 1998.”
Going from “almost assuredly the most talented, educated, hard-working, intelligent student in class” to “DEFINATELY the most average, ho-hum, nothing special, barely worth mentioning student in class,” was a bit of a shock. Check that…it WAS A SHOCK.
1998 carried a few “firsts” for the young Chris Welke:
I failed a class
I felt stupid
I felt “less than”
I felt average (at Cal Poly, I was. In the College of Engineering, I was BELOW AVERAGE)
I sensed Dread. Looming Danger and Doom.
I was placed on “Academic Probation”
Smart and hard-working friends flunked out in the spring (A GPA < 2.0 for fall  Probation. If the following quarter didn’t raise the GPA to >2.0  expulsion) For a freshman, 12 units of fail (let’s say a 4-unit lab, a 4 unit lecture and a 3 unit seminar
….let’s say I failed all 3.
4 unit lab = F, 4 unit lec. = F and 3 unit sem = F.
Now I have a 0.0 GPA heading into Winter quarter, in order to NOT flunk out, I (ideally) re-enroll in these three classes and Ace ALL THREE. B’s would yield a 3.0 for Winter and a 1.5 overall GPA  that’s a bus ticket home. This is an extreme example and not likely to happen; in fact if it did; the Dean of Engineering, seeing such massive improvement, would do two things;
1. Launch a plagiarism investigation and if satisfied that those Bs were legit…
2. Play “Let’s Make a Deal,” offering the student one more quarter to prove himself, likely 12 units of GE and/or major classes yielding grades that would bump the overall GPA to >= 2.0.
Make no mistake; despite the generosity of my family and the Federal Pell Grants that kicked in during my final two years; money was ALWAYS an issue. The work I did for the Computer Science Dept. was volunteer, as was my time at the Daily, KCPR and KVEC (though they all seemed and felt like FT jobs). In that six yr interval, I worked at the Starbucks on Higuera and Foothill, I delivered pizza for the Dominoes franchise on Foothill serving SLO and the franchise in Arroyo Grande serving the Five Cities, I worked on-campus for an English-Lit professor as her aide. And my last “real job” was a contract delivery-boy for some of the finest restaurants in town. If you received catering (or just a burger) from Firestone’s, Thai Palace, The Madonna Inn and a host of other outstanding restaurants in SLO…it was me who brought it to your door.
So now you know a little bit about me.
In case you missed it, you should infer the following; only the 98th percentile QUALIFY for acceptance to Poly….of those a third are accepted. Entrée into the College of Engineering is a pipedream for most. From this fact – it should be obvious that my HS career was characterized by AP classes, a high SAT score, MANY extracurricular activities in which I excelled (for me: brass performance, all idioms), a great deal of volunteer work, a spotless academic record and a demonstrated aptitude for math, science, technology, hard work and fast-learning. That made me a desirable candidate both for the compsci dept., the CE and CPSLO as a whole.
I CHANGED MAJORS. This is intentionally made next-to-impossible by the administration for a variety of reasons, but mainly to further emphasize the superiority and uniqueness of the “fact” that Poly’s freshmen KNOW what they want to do with their lives and have made an official commitment. (that an 18-yr-old doesn’t know what he wants on his ham sandwich is an issue for another edition and beyond the scope of THIS article….).
I was not in the “cheat my way into a more prestigious college/major mode” when I did this. I was in the “if I don’t change majors, I will continue on writing millions of lines of code which I not only am sick to death of…my negative feelings and anxiety attributed to my current major WILL lead to one and only one place: expulsion.
YES I chose an “easier” major…it was a tossup between Journalism (The College of Liberal Arts) or Psychology (The College Science and Mathematics). Both colleges had professors and administrators eager to accept me, but we all must follow the rules; ANY Change of Major is considered a red-flag for the student’s CP career AND the major/college he intends to transfer to. The moment the decision is made –In my case: f— computer science and f— the CPCE – I want to enroll in The College of Liberal Arts as a Journalism major – sorry I don’t have the precise data on-hand, but it likely varies depending on the student, his status w/in his current college/major and the availability and desire of him and his abilities by the faculty and admins of the college/major he wishes to transfer TO).
My status as a compsci major was below average. My desire and reasons for changing majors were sound, honest and based on facts. The faculty, including the Dean of CLA and associate professors of Journalism were eager and willing to have me and transferring from CPCE to CPCLA is a concerted STEP DOWN – clearly I was not trying to “bankroll” my enrolled-status into a major or college I otherwise may not have been accepted into in the 1st place.
Still, changing majors under fairly favorable conditions such as mine were not considered “a good idea,” NOT supported by my family/friends and Cal Poly’s transfer process made it the whole endeavor needlessly complicated, absurdly difficult and nearly led to my expulsion.
Why? Cuz changing majors = bad. This explains nothing; just accept the rule.
How? By setting a ticking time bomb once the process begins.
1. To get into the CPCLA as a Journalism major; I must demonstrate an aptitude for Journalism by taking the core curricula 101-level coursework; and NAILING IT. As in A’s. The actions taken must demonstrate clearly: “Chris wants to be a Journalism major BADLY and CLA believes him; allow him one academic year to prove his aptitude and altruism.”
2. Every class that I’m taking to prove myself to CLA is DAMAGING my CE status. Continuing to take software engineering courses would be counter-productive – they’d sap all my time, detract from my ability to prove myself to the CLA and if I were to succeed, the CSC courses would be waste; they’d count as technical electives. Considering I’d been a CSC major for over 3 years…I had PLENTY of technical electives. Each quarter filled with News Writing, Copy Editing, Creative Writing and Media Law/Media Ethics were quarters where I was an enrolled student of the CE. They allowed one quarter containing [NO MAJOR-SPECIFIC COURSEWORK], the following quarter, CE placed me on Academic Probation for [NOT PROGRESSING w/in MAJOR] meaning one more quarter sans a 4unit lab/lecture with the prefix CSC meant expulsion from CE and since I was not yet enrolled in the CLA  it would be expulsion from Cal Poly in toto. That same quarter, the Dean of The CLA informed me that the Journalism faculty was quite pleased with my performance and that if I excelled next quarter as I had the previous two; he guaranteed that The CLA would accept me with declared major requirement of Journalism firmly affixed.
The Dean did not lie. The following quarter I was enrolled in the Cal Poly College of Liberal Arts Majoring in Journalism. It’s timing was cut SO CLOSE that if viewed under a microscope, you may be able to find that I was expelled from The College of Engineering at EOB on a Friday…and that The Dean of The College of Liberal Arts had already filed and notarized all the necessary paperwork that SAME day, so that when The State California opened on Monday morning, I was enrolled in the CLA. What I’m sayin’ to you is this:
****It MIGHT be public record that I was expelled from Cal Poly. Likely the record shows that I was expelled from CE and simultaneously enrolled in the CLA.
****There is technically no such thing as “changing majors” at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo: Applications and Expulsions are the accurate way to describe it.
****I vehemently oppose requiring an 18 year old to declare a major.
****Like many processes, systems and hoops to jump through at Poly, I do not wish “Changing Majors” on my worst enemy.
As a Poly student; I am completely, totally and absolutely AVERAGE. If you had a super-computer capable of generating a statistically accurate cross-section of male Californians with a B.S. from Cal Poly and hit the “generate” button….every attribute listed would be a perfect match. Like most interfaces, were you to click on [VIEW] select [RANDOM] the only change would be “Name” and slight variations in the numbers (My SAT score would be a bit lower, my aptitude in math would be a bit higher, the six years it took me to receive a B.S. – just a fifth above the avg 5.8)
Do I tell you this to brag about how “smart” or “educated” I am? (Partly yes) Mainly it’s to let you know who is writing this article: a man who fought to get into the best college possible, chose Cal Poly amidst a plethora of respectable universities, maintained a 2.0 throughout six years at Poly while working PT, FT or both, often with one of those jobs paying $0/hr all while being a working, learning, productive, useful, tax-paying, tax-generating and revenue-generating citizen of San Luis Obispo. —and there is absolutely NOTHING special or unique about that – when you compare me to the hundreds of thousands of alumni who did the EXACT SAME THING.
Much more coming soon. [] some fresh content is on hold as another publication has 1st dibs on it. I DO hope they accept it….it is quite eloquent, concise and poetic compared to the drivel, xenophobia, OCD, cringe-humor, mud-slinging, anger-venting and other forms of madness-verging-on-artwork-and-within-the-realm-of-humor found on THIS self-published Web site.
I hope you had a nice holiday.
In 2014- I am grateful for everyone who has visited Tapper7.com and read my work. I am constantly humbled BY you and eternally thankful FOR you. Please do not hesitate to ask for help with your site, blog, podcast…tech issues, problems, security…whatever it is. To my readers I am in debt.
Just click on the [contact me] button or leave a comment….once you navigate the convoluted CAPTCHAS, you can say whatever you want…I’ll print it and respond.
Stay tuned dear reader. Good things are coming down the pipeline. Fun, frivolity, music and information that always has been and always will be free and SECURE. @Tapper7.com

Top 2 projects…

1. editorial for The California Register on Cal Poly SLO and the community that surrounds it….the cash they covet and ultimately the evil they condone.
it took 20years…but they SIMPLY could not hide forever.
2. Podcast hit another speedbump…thx to that really cool ex-gf who stole it…you uh…REALLY ok w/ stealing from a crippled, unemployed man you claimed to love? Who you made the 1st move on?…all an elaborate setup or too much shard? It’s OC so she gets the benefit of the doubt on my “YOU ARE A TWEAKER BITCH AND YOU TOOK MY $500 handheld recorder/mixer/player and prob. got 1 shot of smack didn’t you….was it worth it? A man’s 100s of hours of wk and hard cash…so u can suck a glss d— for 10 minutes? *ahem* forgive dear reader but this is one of those I-have two important steps for her:

  • 1. Get AIDs
  • 2. Die

(she even accused me of it coincidentally…I get blood-tested frequently due to bein 30 percent mechanical…id have faked a panic and said….oh…crap….rem when I did that thing…inside you…by accident? …..yeah, you might wanna get that checked out cuz my t-cell count would’ve made Arthur Ashe breathe a sigh of relief….oh me?
YEP-FBA Bitch!!! (Full-Blown-AIDs) to u non OnA Pests.—she had my wallet and $40 too. f— the 40 I wanted that DVR back. que sera sera ….whatever will get aids will get aids. Podcast to drop as soon as I replace the device OR get it back.

updates also to drop asap on these projects and other awfulness as we approach the Hhhhhh-h-hh–h-h-h—h–h–hHOLIDAYS!!!!!!!! Gagh! *couch* hack, belch [vomiting noises]…sorry just not fun w/o my special lady or my best friend. Not no more.

Quick Update: Cal Poly, Site Update, Project Status Reports etc. et. al….

An image of a granite welcome sign near the western edge of campus- a vandal has added "burying the past to protect our future"

Hello Reader!

Thx for stoppig by…this is an old-school, (almost! teehee..!) txt only what-up post…..
Interesting news development directly related to
The Cal Poly San Luis Obispo News Archive
can be found at The California Register. Read it. Like actually read it. There you go…

Youtube and German Soccer League:
Dropped bogus Copyright claim….
“The Love Theme” from “Dances with Wolves” arr., performed, recorded, filmed, edited and published by Chris Welke in honor of Dominique Mainon (1971-2012) is safe locally and viewable on Youtube by anyone at anytime.
There is no me or anything worth reading BY me w/o her guidance and wisdom.
Please visit her author page on Amazon-film buffs will not be disappointed.
All book purchases benefit her memory and your film-knowledge-base.
Your book collection will also benefit- it’s Value_Add CITY!

Podcast: coming soon – to integrate w/ this blog to provide decent content. More fun. Less words. Clarity++; Info++; Entertaining^2; Boring–;

More-on: Cygwin, Github, C/C++, C++STL, Linux, GNU, C#, D, R, CodeGolf, Bash, csh, gcc, UNIX, Solaris, Raytracing, Netbeans and Howto’s for all my Technophiles…all day and all night “it’s all good baybabaybeh!!!!” -BigPop
#NOTE: Author of “SonOfSamantha.com” still missing plz contact this site if you have info
…if you ARE her all my assistance/resources/protection are yours.
Much love,
-Tapper

Note to readers and sources….

I’ve unearthed a great volume of data and located a breadth of sources and source material.
I will check my mail and touch base with important contacts over the weekend.
Quantity of information outweighs the quality in which I present it-equalization of the two is ongoing.

Apologies if you are waiting on me.

Thank you to all.

-Chris Welke

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo News Archive pt6….library digging (3rd batch)

Plz note: FAIR USE

//EBSCO Host – basic search
redirect//newsbank…null for CP

awfulness…

WOULD-BE PARTIERS FINALLY GET IT – OPINION OF THE TRIBUNE MARDI GRAS PASSES WITH A REDUCED POLICE PRESENCE IN ONCE-WILD SAN LUIS OBISPO

Tribune, The (San Luis Obispo, CA) – March 6, 2009Browse Issues

Readability: 8-9 grade level (Lexile: 1090)

We had to double-check the calendar to make sure but, yes, Mardi Gras weekend did indeed come and go without any of the usual “party-is- over” warnings from the SLO Police Department. Nor did we get the massive police presence we saw the first few years following the 2004 Mardi Gras riots.

There were a few extra officers on the streets as a precaution, but Mardi Gras weekend passed without a ripple. In fact, a SLO PD spokesman said it was even quieter than usual.

That’s good. With the city worrying about a $10 million shortfall, the last thing it needs is to pay its officers overtime to police out-of-control college kids who like to pretend they’re on Bourbon Street instead of Higuera.

With a sigh relief, we toss a bon temps bouquet and a generous handful of beads to the would-be revelers who seem to have finally gotten the message: SLO is no longer the place to party on Mardi.
//author not indexed nby TRIB
//Do you know WHY SLO IS “not the place to party on Mardi? Do ya? Were you at Cal Poly in 2004? Did you see the fucking Nanny State BULLSHIT the city paid for on behalf of the university? Ever been tear-gassed b4? Ever been shot with a bean-bag gun? You know what I was doing when the riots happened? I was playing dominoes with my fellow Senior++’ers in a garage on Hathaway st. when we heard “This is the police, if you are not a resident you must evacuate the area immediately”
I went outside and saw what looked like a tank and about 100 cops marching up and down hathaway, people were running.
We went back into the garage to our game. I lived across the street. This was my friend’s house…I would consider a game of dominoes in smoke-filled garage populated by Six-Year Veterans of the University to be a free assembly, wouldn’t you? WE WERE HAVING A SMALL PARTY HOWEVER.
So what did we do? -we made sure it was just US by kicking everyone out of the house and off the property -which means I have control of my apartment and I can assist to privately secure a friend’s property, but I have no authority on public property. I CANNOT KICK YOU OFF THE STREET THE SAME WAY THE COPS CANNOT KICK ME OFF PRIVATE PROPERTY WHERE I AM AN AUTHORIED GUEST OF THE OWNER OF SAID PROPERTY.
-unless you have a warrant for my arrest
We returned to our game. The mobile PA system updated the broadcast: “THIS STREET IS BEING EVACUATED (per some govt authority, I think they said the state”
Evacuate?
Why?
Evacuate means everyone has to leave…where would I go? My apt. is a across the street. I’m at a friend’s house. There are lots of people outside…most are law enforcement NOT STUDENTS. NOT RESIDENTS OF THE CITY. NOT TOURISTS. MOSTLY LAW ENFORCEMENT.
The real transient population: the troublemakers who came to that area JUST TO START SHIT – Were long gone at this point.
If you didn’t live there or nearby you’d have been 86’d by me or someone like me an HOUR AGO.
Homeland Security (or WHATEVER THE FUCK THAT WAS) did not stop there…
Since this a man-made problem that was already solved…I did not feel the need to evacuate.
Then I something stung my sinuses, hard.
I breathed in felt myself choking.
Someone burst tear-gas—-nearby—-“I’m being tear-gassed,” I thought as I placed my dominoes on the table and ran inside the house.
It was no better inside the house.
Time to run for it. Ever had to run away? WHILE BEING TRAPPED-IN EMINENT DANGER? WITH NO SAFE PLACE TO RUN TO????
…to be continued.

****
//rape ok…but not boobs

COUNCIL COULD KEEP, LIMIT OR TRASH CITY’S ANTI-NUDITY LAW – THE LAW WAS PASSED ON THE URGING OF POLICE OFFICERS WHO SAID FLASHING CONTRIBUTED TO RIOTS DURING MARDI GRAS 2004
Tribune, The (San Luis Obispo, CA) – August 14, 2005Browse Issues
Author: Leslie Griffy
The Tribune
Readability: 6-8 grade level (Lexile: 1030)
A controversial anti-nudity ordinance passed after the 2004 Mardi Gras riots could come off the books Tuesday when the San Luis Obispo City Council reviews it.
Some council members have raised questions about the ordinance, passed at the urging of police who said flashing contributed to riotous behavior during last year’s Mardi Gras celebration. Under the ordinance, flashers face a $100 fine.
Council members could opt to keep the law as it is now, scrap it or limit it to the rowdy Mardi Gras season.
In October 2004, a crowd of nearly 5,000 people gathered at California and Foothill boulevards. It quickly became unruly. Nearly 200 people were arrested for throwing bottles, cans and explosives at police. The reason the throng amassed, according to police: women flashing for beads.

“As these crowds grow, their behavior becomes aggressive and threatening, increasing the danger for the individuals involved,” a police report to the council says.

Police officers reported seeing more than 50 incidents of flashing.

In the report, they compare that number to the one police-reported sighting of flashing during Mardi Gras 2005, when the anti-nudity law was in place.

Still, they say in the report that this year’s incident led to the most harrowing part of the weekend, when a crowd of 800 people, who had gathered to watch the show at Mustang Village, significantly grew after the woman flashed the crowd.

The law isn’t without its critics. No ticket has ever been issued. Some say that proves it’s not necessary. Police counter that proves they’re using it sensibly.

Others charge the law unfairly targets women. The ordinance, the report states, “applies to both men and women (albeit different parts of the body for each).”

Police also cite concerns that intoxicated flashing women could be taken advantage of, noting “staff has located many photos on the Internet of young women flashing their breasts during Mardi Gras in our city.”

The law has made the Web, too. A pro-Mardi Gras group sold T-shirts online that read, “Danger: Contains female breasts. Exposure may cause deviant behavior.”

This year’s Mardi Gras operations, including messaging about the anti-nudity law, cost city taxpayers $385,200. Other agencies that provided backup, such as the CHP, footed nearly $700,000 for the weekend work.

City officials expect the cost of managing Mardi Gras revelers and changing the city’s reputation as the place for the weekend party will decrease over time.

Leslie Griffy covers San Luis Obispo for The Tribune. You can reach her at 781-7931 or lgriffy@thetribunenews.com.

If you go …

The San Luis Obispo City Council revisits its anti-nudity ordinance at its Tuesday meeting, which starts at 7 p.m. The review is the last item on the agenda. For more information, call 781-7100.
Edition: Tribune
Section: Local
Page number: B1
Record: 0508150048
Copyright: Copyright (c) 2005 The Tribune

******2005

PATROLS BEEFED UP FOR MARDI GRAS – THE CITY IS URGING OUTSIDERS NOT TO COME TO PARTY OFFICIALS WANT TO AVOID A REPLAY OF LAST YEAR WHEN NEARLY 200 WERE ARRESTED

Tribune, The (San Luis Obispo, CA) – January 20, 2005Browse Issues

Author: Leslie Griffy
The Tribune

Readability: 11-12 grade level (Lexile: 1260)

Two weeks before Mardi Gras weekend, the city of San Luis Obispo has spent about $20,000 on advertising that urges outsiders not to come here to party.

But officials acknowledge that’s no guarantee the city can avoid a replay of last year’s riots.

“Based on the experience of Chico and Palm Springs and other places that have had similar types of experiences, we believe that we will be very active on the Mardi Gras weekend,” San Luis Obispo police spokesman Rob Bryn said.

City police officers won’t be alone in the effort to maintain order.

San Luis Obispo County sheriff’s deputies, Cal Poly’s University Police Department, CHP and officers from a number of other agencies — such as the Southern Pacific Railroad to University of California police departments — have chipped into help quell crowds.

More than 400 law-enforcement officers will be on the streets that weekend, police San Luis Obispo police Capt. Dan Blanke told the City Council Tuesday night.

Most will be stationed in the north area of town, near California and Foothill boulevards.

About 5,000 people congregated at that intersection last year as partying turned into violence. Nearly 200 people were arrested after the crowd started throwing bottles and rocks at police.

Officials plan to station the rest of the extra law-enforcement presence — about 50 officers on motorcycles and bicycles — downtown this year.

But, officials hope the ads urging people not to invite friends to the area for the holiday will help stem the crowds.

“The message is strong,” city administrator Ken Hampian said, “but that is part of what it is going to change the image of this town.”

Two television spots, costing about $2,000 to produce, are airing on local stations. The largest media purchase — nearly $7,000 for radio ads — is designed to target a traditional college-age demographic.

But stopping student partiers is only one part of preventing problems, Blanke told the council. A Mardi Gras task force has asked downtown bars to not use glass to serve drinks over the holiday.

“We recognize the fact that this is these people’s business and this is the prime time to make money,” Blanke said. “But there will be no Mardi Gras promotions (in downtown bars). We are grateful for that.”

Police plan to set up two operation centers, one at the Ludwick Community Center on Santa Rosa street near downtown and the second on the Cal Poly campus.

They will use the Cal Poly location as booking station.

Although the city has budgeted nearly $374,000 for extra police and the ads, residents are crossing their fingers that the holiday weekend goes smoothly.

“There is no guarantee that everything will go as planned,” Andrew Carter said. “But, I think our police…are doing every thing they can.”

Edition: Tribune
Section: Public Safety
Page number: B1
Record: 0501200057
Index terms: SAN LUIS OBISPO
Copyright: Copyright (c) 2005 The Tribune

#LIES

GO EAST FOR A REAL MARDI GRAS SOLUTION – OPINION OF THE TRIBUNE IN OHIO, COLLEGE STUDENTS WHO ARE FOUND GUILTY OF RIOTING ARE EXPELLED AND LOSE SOME FINANCIAL SUPPORT

Tribune, The (San Luis Obispo, CA) – May 16, 2004Browse Issues

Readability: 11-12 grade level (Lexile: 1280)

The Mardi Gras parade organizers have done the right thing by canceling their parade next year. It’s a step in the right direction in putting the kibosh on future riots by local and visiting students who see the Mardi Gras weekend as an excuse to drunkenly trash the city of San Luis Obispo.

But, as city officials are aware — and they will be making law enforcement plans accordingly — it will take several years before the city’s Mardi Gras reputation recedes from its promise of “beer, boobs and beads.”

If students are rioting, as some letter writers to The Tribune have noted in the three months since the riots, then where is the university oversight of its students? Why can’t Cal Poly step up to the plate and expel students who are arrested for riot-related actions?

The short answer is that the university doesn’t exercise paternalistic control — known as “in loco parentis” — over what a student can or cannot do off campus.

It’s a different issue once a student steps onto state property. This year’s riots at Mustang Village, a railroad track away from campus, were off-limits to university oversight and control.

So what is a valid alternative to collaring college students — both local and from out of the area — who riot annually at a cost of some $500,000 to taxpayers?

The Tribune looked to the Midwest for the answer and may have found it in a law passed in Ohio last year. Some background: Ohio’s three major universities — Ohio State, Ohio University and the University of Cincinnati — have all been plagued by annual student riots in which downtowns were ravaged, cars burned, windows broken, and students and law enforcement officials injured.

In Ohio State’s case, the riots have occurred after OSU won “the big game” with Michigan.

Students at the University of Cincinnati have developed a nasty tradition of rioting during Cinco de Mayo. And Ohio University students, odd as it may sound, trash their downtown when clocks are turned forward for daylight saving time. Why? They feel robbed of an extra hour of bar-hopping.

However, there hasn’t been a riot at any of these schools since 2002. That’s because the Ohio Legislature adopted legislation in 2002 that place real consequences on students who are arrested for failing to disperse at the scene of a riot or emergency.

Here’s how it works: Under the law, if a student at a state-funded college or university is arrested and found guilty of failure to disperse at a riot or emergency, he or she is immediately expelled, can’t transfer or be admitted to another state school for one year, and loses scholarships and financial aid.

We asked Ohio State spokesperson Elizabeth Conlisk if the law was effective and found that the risks of just being a passive observer at a riot were too great for students.

“The law was designed,” she explained, “to keep students from congregating in mass groups, groups so dense that police couldn’t get to the rioting students within.”

Parents are notified of the law before the start of school and before each of the universities’ traditional riot periods. In addition, school athletic facilities like basketball courts and lighted volleyball courts are kept open during these times until 3 or 4 a.m. Conlisk called these “happy activities that go on late at night.” Basically it just redirects student energies.

With knowledge of Ohio’s law, we then asked Dan Howard-Greene, executive assistant to Cal Poly President Warren Baker, if the failure to disperse/expulsion law resonated with the university.

“On the face of it, it seems like it might have positive impacts,” he said, “because students have an interest in their academic standards. It would also provide the campus and community options that they don’t currently have: the ability of campuses to apply sanctions.”

Whether or not the CSU Board of Trustees would support such legislation is unknown, although the board has taken positions on legislation in the past.

We next contacted the offices of Assemblyman Abel Maldonado and Sen. Bruce McPherson. Both legislators were within their districts and unavailable for comment. However, district aides noted that it’s too late in the session to introduce new bills. If a failure to disperse/expulsion bill were to be introduced, it would be after the November elections — after McPherson terms out of office and the outcome of the Maldonado/Peg Pinard contest is known in the Senate.

For our part, we believe Ohio has cut the Gordian Knot that surrounds senseless student rioting. As such, we will be asking whoever may represent our county in 2005 to carry that message to the state Legislature.

Edition: Tribune
Section: Editorial
Page number: B6
Record: 0405170132
Index terms: EDITORIAL
Copyright: Copyright (c) 2004 The Tribune

…lies
OTHER CITIES’ MARDI GRAS RIOTS – OPINION OF THE TRIBUNE

Tribune, The (San Luis Obispo, CA) – March 23, 2004Browse Issues

Readability: 7-9 grade level (Lexile: 1070)

San Luis Obispo isn’t the only city that has been ground zero in Mardi Gras rioting. Cities such as Austin, Texas; Fresno; Philadelphia; Portland, Ore.; and Seattle have all had riots associated with Mardi Gras.

Three years ago this month police representatives from each of those cities got together to compare notes as to why each of the cities’ celebrations turned not only ugly but, in Seattle’s case, deadly.

Consider Seattle: Violence over three nights culminated in a riot on Fat Tuesday. One man was beaten to death after going to the aid of a woman who was being sexually assaulted; 70 injuries and multiple sexual assaults were reported.

Fresno: Fat Tuesday erupted into a riot with crowds throwing bottles at police; two stabbings and 40 incidents of vandalized businesses were reported.

Austin: Riot police dispersed crowds after several thousand turned to violence on each other and police; more than 90 arrests were made.

Philadelphia: Bottles and other objects were thrown at police, a police horse was punched in the head, and an officer was slashed with a knife; more than 90 arrests were made.

The two most common denominators in each instance comes as no surprise: young people and drinking. But that’s not all. After they compared video footage of each of their riots, police commanders found that not only was underage drinking a factor, but unruly crowds willing to confront police with little regard to consequences played a major role in riot ignition.

Nothing new here; these were all components of San Luis Obispo’s Mardi Gras riot.

What’s disheartening, though, is that each of these cities found that their law enforcement presence didn’t seem to deter violence. The Seattle Post-Intelligencer reported at the time that “violent results emerged in cities, regardless of whether officers intermingled with crowds or kept to perimeters … And it didn’t matter if streets were barricaded, organizers charged admission, or even if alcohol was barred.”

Perhaps we were a little understated when we called the findings disheartening.

Virtually each city did away with Mardi Gras parades following the 2001 riots. Has that quelled Mardi Gras-related violence? The answer seems to be that it hasn’t hurt. But the real key that seems to work for each of the above-mentioned cities is having a huge police presence on hand.

Most of the cities have created Mardi Gras zones, areas of their downtowns that have an abundance of nightclubs and bars. The city then barricades that area to outside traffic, allowing celebrants to move up and down the street from watering hole to nightclub to bar.

In Austin’s case, an eight-block area is cordoned off and groups of about 20 police are stationed at each street corner and mid-block. The police are polite but firm that crowds keep moving; alcohol is sold in plastic cups to keep bottles out of the hands of those who might fling them.

Each of these cities has embraced a zero-tolerance approach to underage drinking, extreme public drunkenness, public urination and boobs exposed for beads. While each of the cities displays an overpowering police presence during Mardi Gras festivities, none of them has had a repeat of their 2001 riots.

Is there a lesson here to be learned by San Luis Obispo?

Residents can demand that Mardi Gras be erased from the social calendars of those who would come here for drunken confrontation with authorities. A good first step would involve canceling the parade for a number of years, thus ratcheting down the city’s party destination reputation.

Or, the city can continue to budget ever greater amounts of taxpayer money for the overwhelming police presence that it’s going to take to keep drunk kids from harming themselves and others.

It doesn’t seem like that difficult of a decision to make.

METASEARCH: CP && RAPE && GHB

POLY FRAT’S SUSPENSION MAY BE PERMANENT – SIGMA ALPHA EPSILON ACTIVITIES ON HOLD INDEFINITELY AFTER POLICE SAY THAT STUDENT LIKELY DIED AS A RESULT OF HAZING
Tribune, The (San Luis Obispo, CA) – December 17, 2008Browse Issues
Author: Nick Wilson
nwilson@thetribunenews.com

Readability: 11-12 grade level (Lexile: 1270)

CalPoly has suspended indefinitely the fraternity that hosted a party attended by an 18-year-old freshman in the hours before his death.

And a top CalPoly official said that Sigma Alpha Epsilon will likely never be allowed to rejoin fraternity ranks at the university.

The fraternity hosted a party earlier this month attended by student Carson Starkey. Police said Monday that preliminary evidence gathered indicates Starkey’s death was a result of hazing, an initiation rite. It is illegal in California to put pledges through hazing. No arrests have yet been made in the case.

Starkey was found unresponsive on the morning of Dec. 2 at the home at 551 Highland Drive, where he attended the party and spent the night. He was taken to Sierra Vista Regional Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead.

“Quite frankly, I just don’t see this fraternity ever coming back,” said Stephan Lamb, the university’s associate director of Student Life and Leadership.

An e-mail sent by The Tribune to the fraternity’s president seeking comment on the indefinite suspension wasn’t returned late Tuesday. The fraternity’s top leaders haven’t responded to past requests by The Tribune for comment.

CalPoly announced immediate- ly after Starkey’s death that it was suspending SAE temporarily until police completed their investigation.

Lamb said the university made its decision Monday based on the police department’s announcement of preliminary evidence. CalPoly makes its decisions regarding punitive action against Greek organizations based on a standard that an incident “more likely than not” took place, Lamb said.

SAE was placed on probation twice in the past two years before the December party that Starkey attended.

The fraternity was placed on probation from January until June after a woman alleged she was given the drug GHB, the so-called date rape drug, at an SAE party in 2007. CalPoly officials could never verify the allegations, and the woman dropped charges, Lamb said.

SAE was put on probation in 2007 for about four-and-a-half months for a fraternity-sponsored party that year in Morro Bay that included underage drinking and spilled alcohol on hardwood floors in the city’s community center.

Lamb said CalPoly has suspended all Greek-related activities until after he meets with dozens of leaders from the university’s fraternities and sororities at a retreat from Jan. 9 to 11 in Cambria.

Lamb, who directly oversees the Greek organizations, said he aims to address the fraternity- sorority culture on campus and the use of alcohol. The organization Creative Mediation will be on hand to help with the discussions.

“We have a problem,” Lamb said. “We basically have a situation here where alcohol is putting students at risk.”

TRIB
Section: A-Section
Page number: A1
Record: 0812180002
Copyright: Copyright (c) 2008 The Tribune
***

metaS CP && CORRUPT
Prof: Osama bin Laden was freedom fighter – Required reading for political science class portrays America as ‘neocolonial power’
WorldNetDaily (USA) – January 29, 2014Browse Issues
Readability: >12 grade level (Lexile: 1470)
(Fox News) Osama bin Laden was a freedom fighter and the U.S. is a “neocolonial power,” according to a California state university teacher whose writings are required reading for his political science students.
Emmit Evans, a political science lecturer at the public university CalPoly in San Luis Obispo, requires students in his “World Food Systems” class to read the textbook he co-authored, “The Other World.” In the book, about politics in the developing world, Evans offers up a sanitized version of the 9/11 mastermind and the terrorist group he headed.
“The Al Qaeda movement of Osama bin Laden is one example of an attempt to free a country (in this case, Saudi Arabia) from a corrupt and repressive regime propped up by a neocolonial power (in this case, the United States),” the book says.
^^^^^^^

Poly urged to go ‘conflict-free’ – University president is considering student’s resolution to prevent the school from buying electronics made with minerals that fund war

Tribune, The (San Luis Obispo, CA) – June 13, 2014Browse Issues

Author: Nick Wilson; nwilson@thetribunenews.com

Readability: >12 grade level (Lexile: 1550)

A resolution proposed by a CalPoly political science student aims to prevent the university’s purchase of electronics made using “conflict minerals” mined in the Democratic Republic of Congo and sold to finance war efforts there.

Katie Hoselton successfully passed her resolution in the Academic Senate on May 20.

The resolution now is before CalPoly President Jeffrey Armstrong.

Armstrong is consulting with senior administrators — including the provost and vice presidents — before making a decision on the issue, according to university spokesman Matt Lazier.

Minerals such as tin, gold, tantalum and tungsten are used in the manufacturing of electronic products including computers and mobile phones.

The resolution encourages the university to research purchases of products that may be using conflict minerals and make a commitment to buy “conflict-free products.”

An estimated 5 to 20 percent of the world’s supply of these minerals comes from mines in the Democratic Republic of Congo, though not all mines in the country are used to finance warfare, Hoselton said.

According to the resolution, “the United States Senate and the House of Representatives have found that armed groups bear responsibility for massive atrocities in the eastern Congo.”

Militant groups earn hundreds of millions of dollars every year by trading conflict minerals, and armed groups fight to control mines and smuggling routes, murdering and raping civilians in the process, according to the Enough Project, a Washington, D.C.-based group of policy-makers and activists that focuses on stopping atrocities around the world.

“The hope is that with enough pressure from universities and institutions, companies will begin to trace their supply chains to the source and ensure that the minerals they use in their products are conflict-free,” Hoselton said.

“The resolution would make CalPoly acknowledge the conflict in Congo, and consider conflict minerals when making purchasing decisions in the future,” she added. “This involves putting pressure on tech companies such as Apple and Dell to trace their supply chains to know whether or not they are supporting conflict mines in Congo.”

Hoselton, who hopes to work in international politics, was the university’s 2013 representative in the Panetta Institute for Public Policy’s congressional internship program.

The senior, who graduates this weekend, became interested in boycotting conflict minerals as an intern with the nongovernmental organization Jewish World Watch in 2011.

“This conflict is so unique because rather than the enemy being a corrupt or malicious dictator, the perpetrator is our own system of supply and demand, which operates via the international global supply chain,” Hoselton said. “Myself, my university and the companies I buy from all play a distinct role in this chain. Once I knew this, I decided I would do everything in my power to bring attention to this conflict, in hopes of ultimately bringing it to an end.”

Caption: (1) – Katie Hoselton
Edition: Tribune
Section: Local
Page number: B1
Record: SLO_0405729413
Copyright: Copyright (c) 2014 The Tribune

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo News Archive pt.5….library digging (2nd batch)

Tapper’s wire query, cont’

//<—-my comments are denoted as you’d see them in C/C++/Java source code

//<—-notes, questions, clarification, opinion

####<——most clips are delineated with hashes pending review, editing, organization, etc.

SUSPECT CAN’T HIDE FROM ACCUSERS

Sacramento Bee, The (CA) (Published as The Sacramento Bee) – January 3, 1998Browse Issues

Author: Peter Hecht Bee Staff Writer

Readability: 10-12 grade level (Lexile: 1190)

Each time the young man suspected in Kristin Smart’s disappearance – and apparent killing – gets a new job, he is followed by more batches of cards, letters and phone calls.

Scores of Smart family supporters send his employers news clippings, in which San Luis Obispo County authorities identify former student Paul Flores as the only suspect in the tragic mystery of the Stockton girl who vanished May 25, 1996, from California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo.

He once tried to join the Navy, but after a flurry of calls the Navy said never mind. He moved to Southern California, went to work for a video store, a restaurant and a fast-food joint – only to be dismissed each time when word of the unsolved saga chased him down.

This is the life of the young man last seen with Kristin – a tall, sandy-haired woman of 19 who competed in soccer and swimming, who romanticized over world travels and someday dressing in peach for her wedding. Despite numerous searches, Kristin’s body was never found.

In a search warrant affidavit, San Luis Obispo County Sheriff’s Detective Henry Stewart said he believes Flores “is responsible for or has direct knowledge of her disappearance.” He added: “I also believe Kristin Smart is deceased and either died in Paul Flores’ dormitory room or was placed there for an unknown period of time.”

Flores, who was also 19 and a fellow Cal Poly freshman when she vanished, has never been charged. Authorities say they lack sufficient evidence.

Greg Coates, an attorney representing Flores, denies his client is responsible and said last year that Flores “had nothing to do with the disappearance of Kristin Smart.” Yet Flores is unable to hide from his accusers.

This is also the continuing torment for her parents, Stan and Denise Smart, and a legion of friends and supporters who have taken a quest for justice into their own hands. They’re convinced Flores killed Kristin, buried her body and hid the truth.

Last November, Flores, who had shown up with a black eye the day after promising to walk Kristin to her dorm following a campus-area party, repeatedly invoked the Fifth Amendment in a deposition for a lawsuit filed by the Smart family.

Watching the deposition “was one of the hardest things we’ve ever had to do,” said Denise Smart, a coordinator for an English as a second language program in Stockton. Both Denise and Stan, a Napa High School principal, earlier confronted Flores at a gas station where he used to work. They say he retreated inside without answering their questions.

The Smarts have raided college funds for their other children, Matt and Lindsey, spending $50,000 on attorneys, private investigators and other resources in a quest to find Kristin, justice and peace.

After the recent deposition, Denise wept bitterly. A few days later, she said determinedly: “You’d think people would get a clue – we’re not going to go away.”

The unsolved Kristin Smart case – which spurred a $50,000 reward fund by Gov. Pete Wilson and national coverage on programs from “Geraldo” to “Unsolved Mysteries” – continues to stir calls for greater safety on California campuses.

Kristin’s case was a centerpiece topic in a recent Capitol hearing on campus safety. Allegations that Cal Poly police failed to take her disappearance seriously and bungled the case in the crucial early days are prompting calls for new laws governing investigations of crimes on campus.

“There’s no question about it. There were errors made in the beginning,” said state Sen. Mike Thompson, D-St. Helena, who said he wants stronger policies enabling outside agencies to intervene in cases of missing students or serious crimes on campus.

Thompson hopes to introduce legislation mapping out new cooperation guidelines for campus police and outside law enforcement agencies.

“I’ve been a believer all along that we needed to do something after I saw what happened,” he said.

Kristin’s roommate called Cal Poly police and attempted to file a missing-persons report after she didn’t return following the party. But the campus police didn’t act until a few days later. They told the Smart family she had probably run off for the long Memorial Day weekend.

Nearly five weeks passed before the 14-officer Cal Poly force agreed to let the San Luis Obispo County Sheriff’s Department join in the investigation of a suspected homicide. By then, Stan and Denise Smart – whose persistent pleas for outside intervention included calls to the Governor’s Office and the university president – complained that key time and evidence had been lost.

According to campus police interviews, witnesses said Kristin and Flores were at the same party and that Kristin – a freshman communications major – had appeared intoxicated and was having difficulty walking as she headed back to her dorm at 2 a.m. May 25, 1996.

A witness said Flores volunteered to walk Kristin and another young woman back to their room, according to a campus police report. The other woman told police that as she parted company with the two, Flores asked her for a kiss and a hug. The other woman refused the overture.

She said Flores and Kristin then continued walking toward Cal Poly’s Sequoia Hall. It was the last time Kristin was seen.

Five days after the party, two Cal Poly police investigators asked Flores during a tape-recorded interview why he had a black eye. He told them he got elbowed during a basketball game on Memorial Day. When authorities interviewed other participants in the game, they said Flores showed up with the injury.

According to documents obtained by The Bee, a close friend of Flores later told San Luis Obispo County district attorney’s investigators that Flores told him, “I don’t know how I got the black eye – I just woke up with it.” Asked by his friend why he made up the story about the basketball game, Flores answered: “It would have sounded stupid if I didn’t know how it happened.”

Flores then later told district attorney’s investigators that he injured his eye while working on his truck, according to the investigative report.

Ten days after Kristin was last seen, campus police secured her dorm room. Five days after that, they secured Paul Flores’ room. He already had moved out, clearing out his belongings.

On June 29, more than one month after Kristin vanished, a team of search dogs trained to detect human remains was dispatched by the Sheriff’s Department. The dogs suddenly reacted to a mattress in the third dorm they checked in Cal Poly’s Santa Lucia Hall. It was Paul Flores’ room.

“It was very significant,” said San Luis Obispo County Sheriff Ed Williams. “I’ve been told by experts that these dogs are extremely accurate. But I’d hate for my future to be determined by the nose of a dog.”

Attorney Coates is representing Flores and his parents in the Smart’s civil case – a $40 million suit that also named Cal Poly San Luis Obispo as a defendant. He said Flores “was interviewed at length” by authorities in 1996 and was under no obligation to come forward again. He declined further comment about the case.

It has been an emotional thorn for the Smart family that Coates is being paid by Farmers Insurance under the homeowner’s policy on the Flores family’s house in the San Luis Obispo suburb of Arroyo Grande. Farmers spokeswoman Diane Tasaka in Los Angeles said that unless Flores “is found criminally responsible, the company has a duty to defend him” in the civil case.

In both Arroyo Grande and Stockton, friends and strangers have held fund-raisers for the Smart family’s quest to find Kristin and the truth. A fund in her name is set up at the Union Safe Deposit Bank in Stockton.

Meanwhile, Debbi Schmidt, an airline customer relations manager in Texas, picks up the phone whenever she hears the suspect has a new job. “I will call until I’m blue in the face every person whom I find out he’s working for,” she says.

Schmidt met Denise Smart after Smart called the airline, asking if it could reschedule a prepaid flight to the Atlanta Olympics for her husband and son because they had been out searching for Kristin.

It was an emotionally wrenching union: Schmidt’s son Richard, who had stopped to help a motorist in Colorado, was missing for 153 days before they found his body. A suspect was later tried and convicted.

“I was blessed that they found my son’s body,” she says. “Denise is stuck in a time warp. Her child is missing. She can’t move. And no one can share what she’s feeling.”

Meanwhile, the Flores family is being bombarded with mail. “The Smarts are good, kind people,” read one letter that was returned unopened. “End their trauma. Let the healing begin. Please urge Paul to cooperate.”

The letter, written by someone the Smart family doesn’t know, was part of a foot-high stack of mail sent to the Flores household. The mail was put in a hefty envelope and forwarded to the Smarts. Someone inserted a handwritten note: “Thanks for all your time. The post office likes it.”

Included in the returned items was a photo collage of Kristin that Denise sent, along with a personal appeal: “It is our hope that we will have a resolution to our nightmare soon.”

Denise Smart believes her daughter was murdered, and then defamed by the investigation that followed. She believes police punished Kristin – blaming her for her disappearance much like blaming a rape victim for the actions of her attacker.

Six days after Kristin vanished, one Cal Poly officer’s report noted Kristin had “appeared under the influence of alcohol” and “was not conforming to typical teenage behavior.” He added: “These observations in no way imply that her behavior caused her disappearance.”

Denise Smart responds somberly: “I think the bottom line is that it’s just not in their best interest to find her. . . . In their crime reports, there’s nothing listed on her, no statistical data. It’s just a non-crime, as if nothing happened.”

Cal Poly Police Chief Tom Mitchell defends his department’s handling of the investigation. Otherwise, Cal Poly police refer questions to the Sheriff’s Department. Sheriff Williams said his department has conducted hundreds of interviews – and received help from FBI profilers – but that officially it is only assisting the campus police.

“Kristin deserves what every other child, what every person on this planet deserves,” says her mother, who wonders if anyone is taking responsibility for finding her. “She deserves to be put to rest – and honored – before those who love her. There is no opportunity to do this. You can’t move on. Time is not a healer.”

Caption: Bee photograph / Chris Crewell The Smart family, from left, Stan, Lindsey and Denise, look over a scrapbook of Kristin, whose photo is in foreground.

Murder suspect enters plea – police dodge criticism

//Headline above and story below are correct in hindsight but a threat to justice at the time it was printed. The Register is not known for its Journalism Ethics.

//see comments:

Orange County Register, The (Santa Ana, CA) (Published as The Orange County Register) – May 20, 1999 Browse Issues

Author: BRUCE MURRAY; The Irvine Citizen

Readability: 7-9 grade level (Lexile: 1070)

The man accused of kidnapping and killing former Irvine resident RachelNewhouse and Fresno native Aundria Crawford pleaded not guilty at his arraignment last week.

Rex Allen Krebs, 33, a convicted rapist, sat hunched over, silent and expressionless during his court appearance. Krebs’ attorney, public defender James B. Maguire III, entered the plea for Krebs as a half-full courtroom of local college students, residents and the boyfriend of one of the victims watched.

Meanwhile in Irvine, the family and friends of Newhouse attended a private ceremony for the Irvine High School graduate and former CalPoly student.

Stephanie Morreale, Rachel’s aunt, said more than 250 people turned out for the event, which took place at a U.C. Irvine auditorium.

“The place was maxed out. It was very nice. A lot of her friends talked. We got a chance to say goodbye,” Morreale said.

Morreale said Rachel’s parents have not taken a stance on whether or not they believe Krebs should get the death penalty.

//Was it ethical of this writer to ask the family of a murder-victim about about capital punishment? while the accused was ON TRIAL? This violates SPJ code, that’s //for sure. Insensitive. Irrelevant. Exploitative, Agenda-driven. Sensationalism.

//As stated, EVERYONE KNEW Krebs was guilty. the investigation got fucked up in typical fashion. Incompetency. Corruption.

// How much is still an open question

//Backup to the abstract: The theory is that my rights end where your rights begin. I have a right to free speech. I also have a right to a fair trial (and all that goes w/ //that – voir dire especially). Presumption of innocence.

//So if you are on trial, my right to free speech ends where your right to a fair trial begins. Even if your name is Rex Allen Krebs. Note that the victim’s family //member is fully aware of this in her answer:

“My brother is going to let it (the justice system) run its course,” she said.

//this is the best answer.  Trial and SENTENCING are completely separate. Keeping them separate ensures a higher probability of justice being served.

Krebs is a registered sex offender who moved to a rural canyon community near San Luis Obispo eight months ago after serving 10 years in a state prison for rape, sodomy, assault with intent to commit rape and three burglaries.

Newhouse disappeared Nov. 12, 1998; Crawford was abducted from her home March 12, and Krebs was named as a suspect April 23.

The time span between Newhouses’s abduction and Krebs’ arrest has drawn criticism of the San Luis Obispo Police Department from some local residents. In one letter to the San Luis Obispo Tribune, the writer asks why Krebs, a known sex offender on parole for rape, was not developed as a suspect earlier.

Capt. Bart Topham of San Luis Obispo Police Department would not comment on the issue.

“That letter was speculation,” Topham told The Citizen. “Until the trial is over, the less speculation, the better.”

Morreale said the family has no complaints.

“My brother was very happy with the way the police department handled the case,” she said.
%%%

WHAT’S NEWS

Orange County Register, The (Santa Ana, CA) (Published as The Orange County Register) – May 13, 1999Browse Issues

Author: The Irvine Citizen

Readability: 11-12 grade level (Lexile: 1210)

Murder suspect enters no plea

Convicted rapist Rex Allan Krebs entered no plea at his arraignment last week on charges that he murdered Irvine High School graduate RachelNewhouse and 20-year-old Aundria Crawford of Fresno.

Another arraignment date has been set for May 13.

Krebs, 33, of Idaho, all but confessed to the murders in an interview with the Fresno Bee. Krebs said he was a “monster” who deserved the death penalty.

San Luis Obispo District Attorney Gerald Shea has charged Krebs with murder with the special circumstances of kidnapping, rape and laying in wait.

Newhouse, 20, a former CalPoly student, disappeared Nov. 12, 1998, after she was last seen at a college party at a local restaurant. April 23, police discovered her remains on the property where Krebs lived.

Romantic photo contest underway

Think of the most romantic moment you had in Irvine and capture it in a snapshot.

Mayor Christina Shea’s Romance Task Force is conducting a photo contest to find the pictures that best depict the romance of Irvine. Winning photographs will be chosen among six categories: scenic, people, glamour, “candid” humor, creative and photojournalism that depicts romance.

There is no entry fee, and entrants may submit up to six images per household. The competition is being managed by 30 Minute Photos Etc., which will award $2,000 in prizes, including six separate certificates for a full year’s worth of free film processing.

The contest runs through July 30, and winners will be announced Sept. 10. Winning photos will be placed on the internet.

For more information, contact Mitchell Goldstone, 30 Minute Photos president at (949) 474-7654 or e-mail at 30minphotos@home.com.
@@@@@

Hundreds mourn college students – SEPARATE SERVICES: Students discuss safety at memorials for two women.
Ventura County Star (CA) – April 30, 1999Browse Issues
Author: The Associated Press
Readability: 9-12 grade level (Lexile: 1150)

SAN LUIS OBISPO (AP) — Hundreds gathered at a separate ceremonies for slain college students Aundria Crawford and RachelNewhouse to remember their classmates and discuss ways to stay safe in their carefree college lives.

About 300 people attended Tuesday’s tearful ceremony at Cuesta College held near a pink rose bush placed near the campus’ main fountain.

“Like this rose which will grow in this courtyard in her memory Aundria was beautiful and gave pleasure to those who knew her” college president Grace Mitchell said. “Her grandfather tells me that her favorite colors were pale pink green and metallic silver. This rose will serve to remind us all of the energy verve and color which she brought to our lives here at Cuesta.”

Crawford 20 a Cuesta College sophomore in interior design from Clovis was abducted in March from her duplex. Authorities believe she was kidnapped and killed by a registered sex offender.

“She was happy here and working very hard to accomplish her goals” said Mitchell. “As a parent and grandparent I can only imagine the pain her family and friends are enduring. I am sad and angry that they will no longer have her in their lives.”

Fellow classmate Linda Lujan recalled the first time she met Crawford. Lujan was on crutches and having trouble handling her books at the same time.

“No one else stopped to help me but she did. E She left an impression on my heart that will forever remain” Lujan said through her tears.

The remains of Crawford and Newhouse a California Polytechnic State University San Luis Obispo junior from Irvine were found Friday on the property of Rex Allen Krebs. Newhouse also 20 vanished Nov. 12 as she walked home from a bar.

Krebs 33 who has been in custody at the San Luis Obispo County jail since March 20 for an unrelated parole violation has yet to be charged for the women’s deaths.

However he told the Fresno Bee: “The two girls are dead. If I’m not a monster then what am I?”

Cuesta College officials and students placed other flowers and notes next to the rose bush with light pink blooms that was placed near a fountain. The rose bush will be planted next week in the courtyard. Flags will fly at half staff on campus for the remainder of the week.

At CalPoly about 125 students gathered to remember Newhouse and another missing classmate Kristen Smart who was reported missing May 25 1996 after she was last seen outside her campus dormitory. Krebs was not being investigated for Smart’s disappearance.

The CalPoly students also discussed ways to stay safe. Student Amy Luker advised classmates to keep in contact with friends and relatives.

“Let somebody know where you are even if it means calling your mom. Don’t just take off and study all night” Luker said.

Caption: Photos by The Associated Press CAL POLY MEMORIAL: People hug during a memorial service for RachelNewhouse at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, on Thursday. The woman’s remains were discovered buried in a remote canyon. The CalPoly students also recalled another missing student, Kristen Smart, whose disappearance has not been linked to those of Newhouse and Aundria Crawford, a Cuesta College student. EMOTIONAL MOMENT: Friends of RachelNewhouse show their emotions during a memorial at CalPoly for their fellow student, whose body was found buried in a rural area near San Luis Obispo. Rex Allen Krebs, who owns the property, is the primary suspect in the deaths of both women but has not been charged, although he is in jail on an unrelated parole violation.

*****

KILLING SUSPECT: I’M A MONSTER
Contra Costa Times (Walnut Creek, CA) – April 26, 1999Browse Issues
Author: Michael Krikorian
Readability: 9-12 grade level (Lexile: 1150)
SAN LUIS OBISPO – In a chilling jailhouse interview, the man suspected of killing two San Luis Obispo college students referred to himself as a monster and said he hopes he receives the death penalty.

Eight hours later, San Luis Obispo police announced that two bodies discovered on the remote canyon property where Rex Allan Krebs lived had been identified as those of Aundria Crawford of Clovis and RachelNewhouse of Irvine.

Both bodies were discovered Friday first Newhouse’s, then Crawford’s in a hilly area between Avila Beach and downtown San Luis Obispo.

Police Capt. Bart Topham refused to discuss the cause of death of the two young women, whose disappearance had cast a gloom over this peaceful college town.

Crawford, 20, a student at Cuesta College, was abducted from her apartment March 12. Newhouse, 21, a student at CalPoly San Luis Obispo, vanished Nov. 12. The bodies were identified by dental records.

Krebs, 33, who was arrested on a parole violation March 20, has not been charged in the slayings. However, Topham repeated that he remains “the sole suspect” in the case.

Earlier Saturday at San Luis Obispo County Jail, Krebs his voice raspy, his eyes flat expressed disgust with himself and sympathy for the victims’ families.

“The two girls are dead,” he said. “If I’m not a monster, then what am I?”

Krebs, who has spent nearly half of his life locked up in prisons and juvenile halls, said he was not worried about being sentenced to death.

“I hope they give it to me,” said the Idaho native, who had served 10 years for two rapes in 1987. He was paroled in September 1997.

“God, oh, sorry,” Krebs replied when asked what would he say to the parents of Crawford and Newhouse. His face twisted in torment as he put down the phone in the jail’s visitation room Saturday. A few seconds later, he picked up the phone again.

Krebs also expressed a strong desire to protect the identity of his girlfriend of 20 months, who police believe didn’t know the man she loved might have killed two women. The 23-year-old is five months pregnant with his child.

“Leave her out of this,” he said. “She doesn’t know anything. If you beat me all over this room all day, I still wouldn’t tell you anything about her other than she is so sweet, so nice.”

Krebs had lived in Davis Canyon for at least eight months and worked at a local lumber store.

A registered sex offender, he was arrested for having a simulated weapon and alcohol at his home both parole violations.

Friday, Krebs’ mother, Connie Ridley of Sand Point, Idaho, said she was stunned by news that her son was the prime suspect in the two students’ deaths.

“I knew he’s been in trouble,” Ridley said, “but I never figured he’d ever do this.”
Caption: Scripps-McClatchy News Service
%%%%%%%%%
HUMAN REMAINS FOUND IS THE BODY FOUND NEAR AVILA BEACH THAT OF AUNDRIA CRAWFORD OF CLOVIS?; Fresno Bee, The (CA); April 24, 1999

http://infoweb.newsbank.com/resources/openurl?ctx_ver=z39.88-2004&rft_dat=news/0EAE8B3182048D47&rft_id=info:sid/infoweb.newsbank.com&rft_val_format=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:ctx&svc_dat=NewsBank&req_dat=0DB51BBECE34D0CA
$$$$$$$$$

STUDENT STILL MISSING A MONTH LATER; Contra Costa Times (Walnut Creek, CA); December 12, 1998

http://infoweb.newsbank.com/resources/openurl?ctx_ver=z39.88-2004&rft_dat=news/106400BF3200B472&rft_id=info:sid/infoweb.newsbank.com&rft_val_format=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:ctx&svc_dat=NewsBank&req_dat=0DB51BBECE34D0CA
*******

SLO WOMAN: ‘I KILLED MY HUSBAND’ – SHE PLEADS NOT GUILTY SHOOTING UNPLANNED, SHE SAYS

Tribune, The (San Luis Obispo, CA) – March 3, 2004Browse Issues

Author: Ryan Huff
The Tribune

Readability: 11-12 grade level (Lexile: 1260)

Blythe Coulter-Montanaro killed her husband on Friday to thwart his plan to fly to Oregon and slay a man she reportedly had an affair with some two decades ago, according to court records released Tuesday.

The husband, 48-year-old Richard Montanaro, made his wife load a pistol — which he would use in the killing — last Wednesday or Thursday at their posh San Luis Obispo home, records said. But she hid the gun from him in a bathroom, retrieving it Friday morning after he punched a clock and threw it at her, according to the records.

At that time, she held the gun underneath a coat as the two yelled back-and-forth, fearing that he’d kill her, she told police. Coulter-Montanaro then allegedly shot her husband in the neck, left arm, chest, abdomen and back.

When police arrived, according to the records, Coulter-Montanaro tearfully said, “I killed my husband,” but said she didn’t mean to and that he kept coming at her.

Coulter-Montanaro, 48, pleaded not guilty to a murder charge at an arraignment Tuesday. Judge Barry LaBarbera set her bail at $1 million. She’s expected to post bail this morning with funds from the victim’s mother, said Gregory Jacobson, one of a pair of defense attorneys.

LaBarbera set the next court date for March 23, with a preliminary hearing likely in April.

The slaying happened shortly after 10:35 a.m. Friday at 109 Anacapa Circle — a cul-de-sac of million-dollar homes that back up to Bishop Peak and boast breathtaking views of CalPoly and San Luis Obispo.

Ryan Huff covers courts and county issues for The Tribune. He can be reached at 781-7909 or rhuff@thetribunenews.com.
Caption: – Blythe Coulter-Montanaro is expected to be freed on bail today.

%%%%%

BILLBOARD OF MISSING WOMAN RE-EMERGES – 2ND CAL POLY CASE SPARKS NEW INTEREST

Sacramento Bee, The (CA) (Published as The Sacramento Bee) – December 28, 1998Browse Issues

Author: Peter Hecht Bee Staff Writer

The sign had been down for more than a year. But the face of Kristin Smart, missing since 1996, can be seen once again on a billboard near the campus of California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo.

For the Stockton woman’s father, Stan Smart, a billboard company’s recent decision to erect the sign affirmed that his 19-year-old daughter – a sandy-haired CalPoly freshman who played soccer and dreamed of world travels – won’t be forgotten.

But the renewed attention on Kristin Smart has come for the worst of reasons: Now there are two CalPoly women – Smart and Rachel Newhouse, a 20-year-old nutrition major from Irvine – who have vanished under suspicious circumstances.

Smart’s family and authorities long ago concluded that the freshman communications major was murdered sometime after a fellow student walked her toward her dorm after a campus-area party May 25, 1996.

Smart’s body has not been found. And now Newhouse, a slender woman with light brown hair, is missing – the only clue some traces of blood found near a downtown San Luis Obispo restaurant where she was last seen Nov. 12.

The Smart family has reached out to the Newhouse family, sending messages offering emotional support and volunteering assistance. But so far the Newhouses, locked in their own torment, haven’t responded.

“It’s real difficult,” said Stan Smart, a Napa high school principal. “We would offer them our hugs and concerns and prayers. They’re already doing a lot of things they should be doing. They’re getting fliers out, and they have an Internet Web page set up. But we’re very saddened by the disappearance of Rachel, and feel for her parents.”

Earlier this year, Gov. Pete Wilson signed into law the Kristin Smart Campus Safety Act of 1998, requiring universities and colleges in California to call in local law enforcement agencies immediately in cases of suspected homicides or other violent crimes on campus.

The legislation came after persistent pleas from the Smart family, who charged that CalPoly campus police had badly bungled Smart’s case by failing to treat her disappearance seriously and allowing the only suspect – a fellow student named Paul Flores – to clean out his dorm room and leave campus.

Dogs trained to detect human remains later led San Luis Obispo County sheriff’s deputies to a mattress in the empty room.

Authorities say they lack sufficient evidence to bring charges, and a Flores family attorney has said his client “had nothing to do with the disappearance of Kristin Smart.”

But a sheriff’s detective declared in a search warrant affidavit that Flores “is responsible for or has direct knowledge” of Smart’s disappearance. He said Smart “is deceased and either died in Paul Flores’ dormitory room or was placed there.”

Her mother, Denise Smart, a Stockton bilingual education coordinator, said she got chills when she heard the second missing woman was from Irvine – where Flores has been living. He has been fired from restaurant and fast-food jobs as news of the unsolved case has followed him.

Recently, saying it was responding “to many inquiries by members of the media,” the San Luis Obispo Police Department issued a statement: “Paul Flores, who has been the subject of much attention during the investigation into the disappearance of Kristin Smart, has been eliminated as a suspect in the disappearance of Rachel Newhouse.”

Stan Smart nonetheless has found himself hoping the new case could help find the truth in his daughter’s disappearance. He said it appears as if authorities were responding much more aggressively to the recent case, pointing out that the FBI was called into Newhouse’s case almost immediately after she was reported missing.

In Smart’s case, campus police waited several days to respond, believing she merely wandered off over a Memorial Day weekend.

“It appears to me that they’ve done a lot of right things this time around that they didn’t do with our daughter,” he said.

The Smart family recently dropped wrongful-death lawsuits against Flores and the university.

Stan Smart said the family decided to drop the claim against Flores with the intention of refiling if there are developments.

The family gave up on its claim against the university after negotiations broke down over a settlement that would have involved building a lighted memorial for Smart at the campus street corner where she was last seen.

As another haunting case put Smart’s name back in the news, Denise Smart and Kristin’s sister Lindsey, 16, flew to New York recently to appear on Maury Povich’s show and appeal for a resolution in the case.

Stan Smart and Kristin’s brother, Matt, 19, plan to return to San Luis Obispo in January to again comb the area’s wild lands looking for her body.

“We’re still going to search,” he said. “We’re in it for the duration – until we see some justice.”

Caption: Kristin Smart: The Stockton woman disappeared in 1996 after leaving a San Luis Obispo party. Rachel Newhouse: The 20-year-old was last seen Nov. 12 near a San Luis Obispo eatery.
Edition: METRO FINAL
Section: METRO
Page number: B1
Record: 086
Copyright: Copyright 1998, 1999 The Sacramento Bee
^^^^

COMPANY ORDERS KRISTIN SMART SITE MODIFIED – PRIVACY CONCERNS PROMPT PRESSURE ON SELF-APPOINTED INVESTIGATOR
Tribune, The (San Luis Obispo, CA) – June 21, 2002Browse Issues
Author: Patrick S. Pemberton
The Tribune

Readability: 11-12 grade level (Lexile: 1280)

An amateur private detective trying to find missing Cal Poly student Kristin Smart has been ordered to tone down his Web site.

Dennis Mahon received an e-mail from Homestead Technologies Inc. earlier this week, saying his Web site, www.sonofsusan.com, had to be modified.

“Some of the things that he had on the Web site violated the things he agreed to on the member agreement when he signed up for it,” said Joshua Weinberg, a spokesman for the Menlo Park company.

Mahon’s site includes background information on Kristin Smart, a 19-year-old who disappeared from the Cal Poly campus six years ago. The site also includes information about the main suspect in that case, Paul Flores, and his family, along with theories of what might have happened.

His Web site has garnered several e-mails from people offering tips — tips that are often relayed on the site.

Weinberg said Homestead was particularly concerned with photos and addresses that have been posted without consent of the people involved.

He wouldn’t say if Homestead was concerned about the threat of a lawsuit, but he did say the company was concerned about Web sites that might violate privacy.

“Nowadays just about every company has a privacy policy and a member agreement,” he said.

For a monthly fee, Homestead provides software that allows clients to easily build and maintain their own Web sites. Mahon said the site has been a valuable tool in keeping the case alive and seeking clues to the unsolved mystery.

“It’s been really, really helpful,” said Mahon, whose site has generated more than 17,000 hits in three months. “Basically, I’m putting a new coat of paint on the case.”

Mahon, from North Carolina, has volunteered to investigate the case, posting updates daily on his Web site. To support himself while he’s in San Luis Obispo, he delivers pizzas at night. He is also investigating the disappearance of Kristen Modaferri, an 18-year-old North Carolina woman who vanished during a trip to San Francisco in 1997.

Homestead received a complaint about the site, Mahon said, but he would not say who made the complaint or if the complaint came from the Flores family.

Susan Flores has declined to speak to The Tribune. Paul Flores is currently serving a jail sentence for drunken driving in Santa Barbara County, and his father, Reuben, could not be reached for comment.

Denise Smart, the missing woman’s mother, said she was disappointed by Homestead’s actions.

“It seems to me to be a First Amendment violation,” Smart said from her home in Stockton.

After leads in her daughter’s disappearance had diminished over the years, Smart said, the Web site was generating tips again, offering hope that the 19-year-old freshman might be found.

“It has brought people out of the woodwork,” she said.

Mahon said he is considering legal action to keep his site running. Meanwhile, he has temporarily removed most of the information on the Homestead site, and another host has temporarily posted the former Web site at www.cwwebdesigns. com/sos/.
Edition: Tribune
Section: Local
Page number: B1
Record: 0206260029
Copyright: Copyright (c) 2002 The Tribune
******

LUNGREN’S OFFICE UNLIKELY TO TAKE OVER MISSING-STUDENT PROBE

Sacramento Bee, The (CA) (Published as The Sacramento Bee) – July 2, 1998Browse Issues

Author: Peter Hecht Bee Staff Writer

Readability: >12 grade level (Lexile: 1500)

The family of Kristin Smart, the 19-year-old Stockton woman who vanished two years ago from California Polytechnic University, San Luis Obispo, and is presumed murdered, is asking the state attorney general’s office to take over the case from local authorities.

But after Smart’s parents, Denise and Stan Smart, met this week with the chief of staff for At torney General Dan Lungren, a Lungren spokesman said it is unlikely state officials will intervene.

Lungren’s spokesman Rob Stutzman, who said state justice officials have lent assistance to the San Luis Obispo Sheriff’s Department with criminal profiling and evidence testing, said they take over cases from local authorities only “in the most extraordinary circumstances.”

Since Smart vanished from the Cal Poly campus May 25, 1996, her family has become bitterly frustrated with the police investigation into her disappearance.

The family has complained that Cal Poly campus police failed to treat Smart’s disappearance seriously until several days after she was reported missing.

The campus police, which eventually requested assistance from the San Luis Obispo Sheriff’s Department five weeks after her disappearance, also allowed the suspect in the case to clean out his dorm room and leave campus. Search dogs trained to detect human remains later led investigators to a mattress in the empty room.

Although San Luis Obispo County Sheriff Ed Williams has identified a fellow student, Paul Flores, as the only suspect in Smart’s disappearance, the sheriff has infuriated her family by saying the investigation is stymied because Flores won’t cooperate with authorities.

Greg Coates, an attorney for Flores, has said his client “had nothing to do with the disappearance of Kristin Smart.”

“They (the sheriff’s department) have had the case for over two years and their position is that there is nothing they can do,” said Denise Smart. “. .

What kind of message is that?”

Stutzman said the attorney general’s office has taken over some cases where there was a potential conflict of interest for local authorities. For example, he said, state justice officials are handling an embezzlement investigation of a former Modesto police officer and a drunken driving case involving a Ventura County judge.

Smart’s family has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against Flores, accusing him of her murder. Her parents have also sued Cal Poly over the university’s handling of the case. The attorney general’s office is defending the university in the civil claim.

“The attorney general is using state resources to defend the college,” Denise Smart said. “Why aren’t they using state resources to investigate the disappearance of someone who vanished off of their campus?”

Edition: METRO FINAL
Section: MAIN NEWS
Page number: A5
Record: 211
Copyright: Copyright 1998 The Sacramento Bee
%%%%%

Denise Smart and her husband, Stan — a director of secondary education in Napa — assume their daughter is dead.

But they still hold out hope that someone will come forward and tell them what happened to her body.

“We’d never have her life back,” Denise Smart said, “but we would have her.”

Her mother has put together a video of Kristin’s life to show May 19.

“I put it off for a long time because I knew it would be hard,” she said. “Yet after I finished it, I realize what a good experience it was and how much Kristin did in such a short amount of time. A lot of really good memories came back to me.”

San Luis Obispo County sheriff’s Lt. Steve Bolts said that department has accepted the Smarts’ invitation to attend the memorial service. The case continues to be open and is actively being investigated, he said.

“We’re working closely with a number of agencies, including the FBI, Cal Poly Police and the state Department of Justice,” Bolts said.

Kristin Smart also will be remembered, along with murder victims Aundria Crawford and Rachel Newhouse, during a run and walk May 19 at Laguna Lake Park.

The money raised through registration fees will benefit the Rachel Newhouse Endowment Fund and the Cal Poly “ReMEmber Me” group that also memorializes Smart and Crawford. The group works to prevent sexual assault and violence against women and sponsors programs such as “Take Back the Night” and an annual candlelight vigil at Farmers’ Market in San Luis Obispo.

If you go …
San Luis Obispo County sheriff’s Lt. Steve Bolts said that department has accepted the Smarts’ invitation to attend the memorial service. The case continues to be open and is actively being investigated, he said.
****//partial-trib

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo News Archive pt4….library digging (1st batch)

This is pg.1 of the wire and transcript news I found at a local library. The Orange County Public Library (after visiting in person and restoring my account by paying off $10.52 in fines) ocpl.org I was able to access their version of lexis-nexis, called NewsBank…I found a grip of hard-to-find stories but quite a bit remains missing.

It’s a bummer man….

Where is the publisher of SonOfSamantha.com? The mother of the woman who went missing at Cal Poly in 1998? What is the missing students name? What is her name? Where is she? Why can’t I find any info on this?
You’ll see what I did find (some relevant to the archive, some less so, the 1st story is almost irrelevant entirely).
YOU WON’T SEE WHAT I DID NOT FIND! heh…obviously…..*sigh*
NewsBank has options to display links to the stories, and I displayed them, but whether or not they would be accessible to you from my page is unknown, so I dumped all the text into this and other pages so YOU can see what I HAVE so far WHILE I continue to work on it’s relevancy, organization and presentation. For now:

avail : http://infoweb.newsbank.com/resources/?p=NewsBank
This is a batch data dump “Cal Poly” “SLO” “suspicios “murder”
SOURCE:NewsBank, a less comprehensive version of lexis-nexis
Qeury = CAPSLO; Murder; 1900 1900
NUDE TEAM PHOTO WON’T APPEAR IN CALENDAR AS IS; San Jose Mercury News (CA); November 21, 1998
***Covered under fair use as part od a comprehensivehisrorical achrchive****
***Data is parsed in pt1-pt3 for late use as source material***
***It has been cut for data mining and value******
***Wire copy is authorized****
http://infoweb.newsbank.com/resources/openurl?ctx_ver=z39.88-2004&rft_dat=news/0EB7224B695569F7&rft_id=info:sid/infoweb.newsbank.com&rft_val_format=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:ctx&svc_dat=NewsBank&req_dat=0DB51BBECE34D0CA
NUDE TEAM PHOTO WON’T APPEAR IN CALENDAR AS IS
San Jose Mercury News (CA) – November 21, 1998
Author: Mercury News Wire Services
The controversial nude photograph of the CalPoly-SanLuisObispo water polo club team will be made into a calendar after all, but only after it is digitally altered.
Matt Landre, club president, said university Recreational Sports officials agreed to the change Wednesday, a day after banning the picture.
Landre said the original photo, which features 22 team members wearing nothing but their caps and holding strategically placed water polo balls, will be altered by a graphic artist, who will draw in swimsuits on a few players. Most of the players are already obscured by the water polo balls and do not require any further coverage.
The club team intended to publish the photo in a calendar to raise money for its trip this month to the national club championships, and hopes to have the new version available by Thanksgiving.
Memo: State News in Brief
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Search continues for CalPoly student
Ventura County Star (CA) – November 20, 1998Browse Issues
Author: The Associated Press
Readability: 9-12 grade level (Lexile: 1150)
#SAN LUIS OBISPO (AP) — Police on Thursday searched for a female student from CalPolySanLuisObispo who vanished a week ago after a night of drinking the second woman from the campus to disappear in just more than two years.
The family of 20-year-old Rachel Newhouse of Irvine is offering a $10000 reward for information leading to her whereabouts and the FBI has joined the criminal investigation police said.
Newhouse a junior studying nutrition vanished Nov. 12 after a night of drinking that ended at a fraternity party at a downtown restaurant and bar police said.
Thursday police started searching the Cold Canyon Landfill on the southern edge of town SanLuis police Capt. Bart Topham said in a statement.
He said searching the dump was a “precautionary measure” and did not result from a “specific lead from the investigation.” The search could take several days he said.
Over the weekend Newhouse’s family and friends walked possible routes she might have taken searching for any clues. Helicopters and police dogs joined them.
Topham said investigators were continuing to identify and interview people known to have been in the vicinity of Tortilla Flats that night.
“A considerable number of interviews have been conducted but we have many more do to” Topham said.
The FBI is developing a tracking system to help police manage the huge volume of information that is being gathered in the investigation he said.
Topham denied there is any link between Newhouse’s disappearance and that of a 19-year-old CalPoly student last seen Memorial Day weekend 1996 at a campus party.
Students residents and police are still baffled by the disappearance of Kristin Smart. The Stockton woman has never been found.
Topham refused to say whether police have any suspects in Newhouse’s case. He said test results from blood found on a bridge railing will not be available until next week.
The bridge is considered one of the possible routes Newhouse may have taken if she was walking home from the Tortilla Flats restaurant Topham said.
Newhouse has attended CalPoly since September 1996 after graduating from Irvine High School.
Newhouse’s uncle Peter Morreale of Riverside said his niece had been drinking at the party with about 200 other people. She had gone there with friends. At some point she was asked for identification to prove her age and she left he said.
“No one’s seen her since” Morreale said.
**********************************8
LAW CLARIFIES JURISDICTION OF CAMPUS POLICE; Contra Costa Times (Walnut Creek, CA); August 12, 1998

http://infoweb.newsbank.com/resources/openurl?ctx_ver=z39.88-2004&rft_dat=news/1063FFFF4B961D2D&rft_id=info:sid/infoweb.newsbank.com&rft_val_format=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:ctx&svc_dat=NewsBank&req_dat=0DB51BBECE34D0CA
Edition: Ventura
Section: News
LAW CLARIFIES JURISDICTION OF CAMPUS POLICE
Contra Costa Times (Walnut Creek, CA) – August 12, 1998Browse Issues
Readability: >12 grade level (Lexile: 1320)
SACRAMENTO Legislation designed to improve coordination between campus cops and other law enforcement agencies has been signed into law.
The measure by Sen. Mike Thompson, D-St. Helena, was prompted by the disappearance of Kristin Smart, a CalPoly-SanLuisObispo student who vanished in May 1996.
Smart’s parents have accused campus police of mishandling the investigation of their daughter’s disappearance and ignoring their pleas to hand over the case to a more experienced agency.
Thompson’s bill requires California colleges and universities to sign agreements with their local law enforcement agencies to stipulate the procedures that will be used in investigating violent campus crimes.
*************************************
MISSING WOMAN’S FAMILY, FRIENDS KEEP PRESSURE ON SUSPECT; Scripps Howard News Service; January 4, 1997
http://infoweb.newsbank.com/resources/openurl?ctx_ver=z39.88-2004&rft_dat=news/0EB7B2DC1829F405&rft_id=info:sid/infoweb.newsbank.com&rft_val_format=info:ofi/fmt:kev:mtx:ctx&svc_dat=NewsBank&req_dat=0DB51BBECE34D0CA
Scripps Howard News Service – January 4, 1997Browse Issues
Author: PETER HECHT, Scripps-McClatchy Western Service
Readability: 10-12 grade level (Lexile: 1200)
SACRAMENTO, Calif. – Each time the young man suspected in Kristin Smart’s disappearance – and apparent killing – gets a new job, he is followed by more batches of cards, letters and phone calls.
Scores of Smart family supporters send his employers news clippings, in which San Luis Obispo County authorities identify former student Paul Flores as the only suspect in the tragic mystery of the Stockton girl who vanished May 25, 1996 from CalPoly San Luis Obispo.
He once tried to join the Navy, but after a flurry of calls the Navy said never mind. He moved to Southern California, went to work for a video store, a restaurant and a fast food joint – only to be dismissed each time when word of the unsolved saga chased him down.
This is the life of the young man last seen with Kristin – a tall, sandy-haired woman of 19 who competed in soccer and swimming, who romanticized over world travels and someday dressing in peach for her wedding. Despite numerous searches, Kristin’s body was never found.
In a search warrant affidavit, San Luis Obispo County sheriff’s detective Henry Stewart said he believes Flores “is responsible for or has direct knowledge of her disappearance.” He added: “I also believe Kristin Smart is deceased and either died in Paul Flores’ dormitory room or was placed there for an unknown period of time.”
Flores, who was also 19 and a fellow CalPoly freshman when she vanished, has never been charged. Authorities say they lack sufficient evidence.
Greg Coates, an attorney representing Flores, denies his client is responsible and said earlier this year that Flores “had nothing to do with the disappearance of Kristin Smart.” Yet Flores is unable to hide from his accusers.
This is also the continuing torment for the Smart family, her parents Stan and Denise, and a legion of friends and supporters who are convinced Flores killed Kristin, buried her body and hid the truth.
Last November Flores, who had shown up with a black eye the day after promising to walk Kristin to her dorm following a campus-area party, repeatedly invoked the 5th Amendment in a deposition for the lawsuit filed by the Smart family.
The Smarts have raided college funds for their other children, Matt and Lindsey, spending $50,000 on attorneys, private investigators and other resources in a quest to find Kristin, justice and peace.
The unsolved Kristin Smart case – which spurred a $50,000 reward fund by Gov. Pete Wilson and national coverage on programs from “Geraldo” to “Unsolved Mysteries” – continues to stir calls for greater safety on California campuses.
Kristin’s case was a centerpiece topic in a recent Capitol hearing on campus safety. Allegations that CalPoly police failed to take her disappearance seriously and bungled the case in crucial early days are prompting calls for new laws governing investigations of crimes on campus.
“There’s no question about it. There were errors made in the beginning,” said state Sen. Mike Thompson, D-Helena, who said he wants stronger policies enabling outside agencies to intervene in cases of missing students or serious crimes on campus.
Kristin’s roommate called CalPoly police and attempted to file a missing persons report after she didn’t return following the party. But the campus police didn’t act until a few days later. They told the Smart family she had probably run off for the long Memorial Day weekend.
Nearly five weeks passed before the 14-officer CalPoly force agreed to let the San Luis Obispo County Sheriff’s Department join in the investigation of a suspected homicide. By then, Stan and Denise Smart – whose persistent pleas for outside intervention included calls to the governor’s office and the university president – complained that key time and evidence had been lost.
According to campus police interviews, witnesses said Kristin and Flores were at the same party and that Kristin had appeared intoxicated and was having difficulty walking as she headed back to her dorm at 2 a.m. May 25.
A witness said Flores volunteered to walk Kristin and another young woman back to their room, according to a campus police report. The other woman told police that as she parted company with the two, Flores asked her for a kiss and a hug. The other woman refused the overture.
She said Flores and Kristin then continued walking toward CalPoly’s Sequoia Hall. It was the last time Kristin was seen.
Five days after the party, two CalPoly police investigators asked Flores during a tape recorded interview why he had a black eye. He told them he got elbowed during a basketball game on Memorial day. When authorities interviewed other participants in the game, they said Flores showed up with the injury.
According to documents obtained by The Sacramento Bee, a close friend of Flores later told San Luis Obispo County district attorney’s investigators that Flores told him, “I don’t know how I got the black eye – I just woke up with it.” Asked by his friend why he made up the story about the basketball game, Flores answered: “It would have sounded stupid if I didn’t know how it happened.”
Flores then later told district attorney’s investigators that he injured his eye while working on his truck, according to the investigative report.
Ten days after Kristin was last seen, campus police secured her dorm room. Five days after that, they secured Paul Flores’ room. He already had moved out, clearing out his belongings.
On June 29, more than one month after Kristin vanished, a team of search dogs trained to detect human remains was dispatched by the Sheriff’s Department. The dogs suddenly reacted to a mattress in the third dorm they checked in CalPoly’s Santa Lucia Hall. It was Paul Flores’ room.
“It was very significant,” said San Luis Obispo County Sheriff Ed Williams. “I’ve been told by experts that these dogs are extremely accurate. But I’d hate for my future to be determined by the nose of a dog.”
Attorney Coates is representing Flores and his parents in the Smart’s civil case – a $40 million suit that also named CalPoly San Luis Obispo as a defendant. He said Flores “was interviewed at length” by authorities in 1996 and was under no obligation to come forward again. He declined further comment about the case.
Meanwhile, Debbi Schmidt, an airline customer relations manager in Texas, picks up the phone whenever she hears the suspect has a new job. “I will call until I’m blue in the face every person whom I find out he’s working for,” she says.
Schmidt met Denise Smart after Smart called the airline, asking if it could reschedule a prepaid flight to the Atlanta Olympics for her husband and son because they had been out searching for Kristin.
It was an emotionally wrenching union: Schmidt’s son Richard, who had stopped to help a motorist in Colorado, was missing for 153 days before they found his body. A suspect was later tried and convicted.
“I was blessed that they found my son’s body,” she says. “Denise is stuck in a time warp. Her child is missing. She can’t move. And no one can share what she’s feeling.”
The Flores family is being bombarded with mail. “The Smarts are good, kind people,” read one letter that returned unopened. “End their trauma. Let the healing begin. Please urge Paul to cooperate.”
The letter, written by someone the Smart family doesn’t know, was part of a foot-high stack of mail sent to the Flores household. The mail was put in a hefty envelope and forwarded to the Smarts. Someone inserted a handwritten note: “Thanks for all your time. The post office likes it.”
Denise Smart believes her daughter was murdered, and then defamed by the investigation that followed. She believes police punished Kristin – blaming her for her disappearance much like blaming a rape victim for the actions of her attacker.
Six days after Kristin vanished, one CalPoly officer’s report noted Kristin had “appeared under the influence of alcohol” and “was not conforming to typical teenage behavior.” He added: “These observations in no way imply that her behavior caused her disappearance.”
CalPoly Police Chief Tom Mitchell defends his department’s handling of the investigation. Otherwise, CalPoly police refer questions to the sheriff’s department. San Louis Obispo Sheriff Ed Williams said his department has conducted hundreds of interviews – and received help from FBI profilers – but that officially it is only assisting the campus police.
“Kristin deserves what every other child, what every person on this planet deserves,” says her mother, who wonders if anyone is taking responsibility for finding her. “She deserves to be put to rest – and honored – before those who love her. There is no opportunity to do this. You can’t move on. Time is not a healer.”
Memo: (Peter Hecht writes for the Sacramento Bee in California.)
Section: Scripps Howard News Service National/Health Science Technology
Record: 9801050161
Copyright: Copyright (c) 1997 Scripps Howard News Service
***
Kristin Smart: Missing since 1996
News & Politics Examiner (USA) – February 6, 2011Browse Issues
Author: Jerrie Dean
Readability: 9-12 grade level (Lexile: 1110)
The following story began as a way to inform my readers of the disappearance of Kristin Smart, but this story has so much more to it, that it could not be told in one article. I have separated it in to 4 parts. I want to thank Denise Smart, Kristin’s mother and Dennis Mahon for talking to me.
Kristin Smart – The day of her disappearance
Kristin Smart was finishing up her freshman year at California Polytechnic State University (aka Cal Poly), where she was majoring in architecture. Kristin was a beautiful 19-year-old young woman, with long dark blonde hair and brown eyes. She was statuesque at 6’1″ and 145 pounds. On Memorial Day weekend, 1996, Kristin went to a party off campus on Crandall Way in San Luis Obispo, Calif. Witnesses at the party said that Kristin was acting drunk and was having trouble walking.
Around 2:00 a.m., most of the guests had left, Tim Davis found Kristin laying on the lawn of the house next door. Cheryl Anderson who had lost track of her friends, started talking with Davis and they decided to walk together back to the dorms, taking Kristin with them.
Anderson, Davis and Kristin began walking when Paul Flores joined them. Paul Flores had been seen at the party earlier that night. About 100 yards from the dorm, Davis who was heading in a different direction separated from the group. A little farther along, Anderson separated from Kristin and Flores as she needed to go in a different direction towards the Sierra Madre dorms. Anderson said she saw Flores walking Kristin up the street towards the Santa Lucia and Muir Hall dorms as she turned and walked towards her dorm.
There has been a difference of opinion on what happened that night. Kristin’s family believe that Anderson and Davis know more than what they are saying.
“Our family is concerned that they hold a secret, one that may not lead directly to our daughter, but would lead to a better understanding of the events of that night,” said Denise Smart, Kristin’s mother. “Keeping that secret when they were 18-19 was one thing, but 15 years later, we would hope that they understand the cost to our family.”
Very early that morning, Kristin’s roommate contacted the police when she didn’t come back to her room at the dorm. At first the police thought she was probably off somewhere, because of the long school break, but after several days, they began the investigation into her whereabouts by calling Kristin’s parents.
No one knew where Kristin was. The Cal Poly police began their search for her.
HUMAN REMAINS FOUND IS THE BODY DISCOVERED NEAR AVILA BEACH THAT OF AUNDRIA CRAWFORD OF CLOVIS?
Fresno Bee, The (CA) – April 24, 1999Browse Issues
Author: MICHAEL KRIKORIAN THE FRESNO BEE
Readability: 6-8 grade level (Lexile: 1030)
The strand of hope that a young Clovis woman missing for six weeks might be alive was slashed Friday when police announced they had discovered human remains at the home of a convicted rapist they say is responsible for the slayings of the woman and another college student.
#KREBS
Rex Allen Krebs, 33, of Avila Beach is the prime suspect in the deaths of Aundria Crawford of Clovis and Rachel Newhouse of Irvine, San Luis Obispo police Capt. Bart Topham said. Krebs, who is not charged in the slayings, has been jailed on a parole violation since March 20.
The body was found Friday afternoon on property rented by Krebs in a remote canyon south of San Luis Obispo. Authorities would not say whether the victim was male or female.
At a news conference, Topham repeatedly deflected questions as to why police felt Krebs was the lone suspect in both students’ deaths when only one body had been found.
“When we have completed all of our crime scene work, we will be able to discuss more information,” Topham said. “Our focus must remain the successful conclusion and prosecution of this case.”
Crawford, 20, was attending Cuesta College when she vanished from her home March 12. Newhouse, a 21-year-old student at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, disappeared Nov. 12, 1998.
The 5-foot 6-inch, 170-pound Krebs became a target of the investigation shortly after he was arrested for parole violations that included possession of a simulated firearm, believed to be a BB gun.
The families of Crawford and Newhouse could not be reached to comment Friday. Police summoned them to San Luis Obispo on Thursday afternoon.
However, Krebs’ mother was stunned by the news that her son was the one and only suspect in the students’ deaths.
“h, God. Oh, God. Why? Why? Why?” Connie Ridley said from her home in Sand Point, Idaho. “Why the hell did he do this? I know he’s been in trouble, but I never figured he’d ever do this.
“I’m so sorry, so sorry for the families, for the girls,” said Ridley, 53. “If there was something that I could do for them, I would.”
Krebs served 10 years in California state prisons, most of it in Soledad, for two violent 1987 rapes in south San Luis Obispo County. He was paroled in 1997 and went back to his native Idaho for a short time before returning to the San Luis Obispo area.
Police said Krebs is not a suspect in the May 1996 disappearance of CalPolystudent Kristin Smart, 19, because she vanished when Krebs was in Soledad.
riday morning, before she learned a body was found on his property, Ridley said she was confident her son was not the killer.
“Things are going so good for him,” she said. “He has a new girlfriend with a baby on the way. He just got a new truck. He has his own place. He has a good job. Why would he screw up?”
Crawford was born in Pasco, Wash., to Gail and James Eberhart. Her parents divorced when she was 6 months old, and her mother raised her in Fresno.
She went to Bullard High before transferring her senior year. She graduated from Fresno Unified’s ReStart independent-study program. She spent one year at Fresno City College.
Jeffrey Hopkins, now at Fresno High, was one of her favorite teachers during her days at Bullard.
Crawford sought out Hopkins for a letter of recommendation before heading to school on the coast.
Hopkins said he gladly wrote the letter.
“She was committed to drafting and engineering,” said Hopkins, who had Crawford as a student in computer-aided drafting and architecture classes.
Hopkins recalled that Crawford was “fairly athletic, quiet, but not shy. She’d fight back.”
News that Krebs was the prime suspect in the slayings brought relief to many in this college town, which often makes lists of the best small cities in the United States.
“I know I felt better knowing they arrested somebody,” said Christine Smith, who works full-time in a medical-billing job, but often attends night classes at Cuesta College. “I grew up in Fresno and Fresno makes this place seem like Disneyland. But for the last few months, it’s been scary around here.”
At the Gaslight Saloon east of San Luis Obispo where Krebs occasionally stopped, the owner said the suspect was “very polite and quiet.”
“He’d come in maybe once or twice a week, have a beer and go,” Gaylynne Balesteros said. “Then a couple months ago, he stopped coming around.”
Rex Allen Krebs was born Jan. 28, 1966, in Idaho. His mother, who has since remarried, said life was rough because her ex-husband, Al Krebs, would often hit the young boy.
“One time my brother was playing around with my son when he was about 7 years old, Rex fell on his butt and he started crying really loud,” recalled Ridley, who separated from her husband when Krebs was 3. “My brother took him into the bathroom and pulled down his pants and his butt and back were all black and blue.”
Attempts to reach Al Krebs in Idaho were unsuccessful.
Ridley said that at age 13, her son attacked a girl at a movie theater in Sand Point. The attack landed him in juvenile hall, she said.
“Most of his schooling, his education, Rex got behind bars,” his mother said.
In 1984, when Krebs was 17, he was convicted of grand theft for stealing a Jeep. He served 20 months in prison. When he got out he moved to California to live in Grover City with his mom and her new husband.
Krebs got a job at a fast-food restaurant, then upgraded to a job installing garage doors. He bought a 1965 Volkswagen bug. He had a girlfriend. He fixed up his mother’s garage, turning it into his apartment. It was the best time of Krebs’ life, his mother believes.
Then he raped two women. The incidents occurred in May and July of 1987. In the first case, he threatened his victim with a knife. In the second, it was a screwdriver.
At the sentencing for both rapes, a San Luis Obispo County judge gave him a long lecture.

Superior Court Judge William B. Fredman told Krebs, who was 20 at the time, on Oct. 26, 1987: “You are going to be in prison for a substantial period of time [he served 10 years] . . .”
The judge recommended some group therapy sessions available to prisoners.

“I strongly hope,” Fredman said, “that you take advantage and resolve when you do get out you can lead a life of a good citizen and not offend again.”
* Bee staff writer Donald E. Coleman contributed to this report
Caption: Aundria Crawford Rex Krebs JAYSON MELLOM – SAN LUIS OBISPO TELEGRAPH-TRIBUNE Investigators announced they discovered human remains at the rural house where Rex Krebs lives near Avila Beach. THE FRESNO BEE Map. Body found. Authorities investigating the disappearance of Aundria Crawford and Rachel Newhouse said Friday they had found human remains in a canyon south of San Luis Obispo.
Index terms: MULTIPLE DEATH WOMEN FZCO
Copyright: Copyright (c) 1999 The Fresno Bee
****
VIOLENT SUSPECT EMERGES CONVICTED RAPIST IS BEING QUESTIONED BY SAN LUISOBISPO POLICE IN THE DISAPPEARANCE OF AUNDRIA CRAWFORD.
Fresno Bee, The (CA) – April 23, 1999Browse Issues
Author: PABLO LOPEZ THE FRESNO BEE
Readability: 9-12 grade level (Lexile: 1120)
A convicted rapist is a prime suspect in the disappearance of former Fresno resident Aundria Lynn Crawford, a Cuesta College studentmissing since March, the San Luis Obispo Police Department reported Thursday.
Rex Allan Krebs, 33, is being held in San Luis Obispo County Jail on a parole violation, police Capt. Bart Topham said. Krebs has not been charged with murder but is being questioned about the disappearance of Crawford, as well as that of another college student, Rachel Newhouse, Topham said.
Police declined to say what Krebs did to violate parole.
Thursday, a force that included police and sheriff’s detectives, the FBI and state parole agents searched the area around Davis Canyon Road south of San Luis Obispo, where Krebs reportedly last lived.
The disappearances of Crawford and Newhouse and that of Kristin Smart, have terrified the community of 43,000. More than 100 students – and a half-dozen parents – have sought counseling offered by Cuesta. Smart, another CalPolystudent, was last seen May 25, 1996.
Authorities say Krebs has a violent history, including attacks on two women in 1987.
In the first case, Krebs followed a woman from a restaurant to her Oceano home May 24 and broke into her home, according to the San Luis Obispo County Telegram-Tribune.
The 21-year-old victim told police she awoke to find Krebs holding a butcher knife over her throat and telling her he would kill her if she screamed, the newspaper reported.
He asked the woman whether her kitchen knives were sharp enough to cut her throat, she told police. When she said she didn’t know, he pulled out a hunting knife. He then cut off her pajamas and raped her, according to court records.
Afterward, he hog-tied her and said “have a nice day” before leaving, the newspaper reported.
In the second case, a 30-year-old woman with her 7-year-old daughter sleeping beside her was attacked in an Arroyo Grande apartment July 15.
She said Krebs burst into her home, jumped on her bed and threatened her with a screwdriver, the newspaper reported.
She said she struggled with him, took a knife from his belt and tried to stab him. As she stabbed him, he bit her right hand, severing the tendon on one finger. The woman said Krebs beat her, but she was able to run away and get help.
Police later arrested Krebs after he was recognized as a worker at a construction site next to the woman’s apartment complex.
In October 1987, he pleaded no contest to rape, sodomy, assault with the intent to commit rape and three burglaries, the newspaper reported. He was sentenced to 20 years in prison.
Krebs, a garage door hanger, had been paroled to Grover City from Idaho in March, the newspaper reported.
Caption: Aundria Crawford
**
Angels player offers $50,000 reward – Calpolystudent: Family hopes extra money will spark leads in disappearance.
Ventura County Star (CA) – November 21, 1998Browse Issues
Author: The Associated Press
Readability: 10-12 grade level (Lexile: 1180)
#NEWHOUSE
SAN LUIS OBISPO (AP) — The family of a missing California Polytechnic State University student hopes a $50000 reward offered by Anaheim Angels center fielder Jim Edmonds and his agent will spur new leads in the case.
Rachel Newhouse 20 of Irvine vanished more than a week ago after leaving an off-campus bar apparently intending to walk the two miles home because she didn’t have her car.
The offer by Edmonds and sports agent Dwight Manley makes a total of $60000 offered in the case. Her family is offering $10000.
Stephanie Morreale Newhouse’s aunt said Friday the family hopes Edmonds’ prominence and the amount of the reward will spur new leads.
“We’re taken aback” Morreale said. “It’s just a wonderful generous offer. It can only help. E The fact that it’s him (Edmonds) and he’s such a well-loved sports figure it might open the eyes of someone who might not be looking.”
In a letter sent to the family Edmonds and his agent said they are also Orange County residents and that everyone needs to realize Newhouse could be someone they know Morreale said.
Newhouse is the second student in two years to disappear from CalPoly San Luis Obispo 150 miles northwest of Los Angeles. Kristin Smart 19 of Stockton was never found after last being seen at a 1996 Memorial Day weekend campus party.
Newhouse a junior studying nutrition vanished Nov. 12 after attending a fraternity party at a downtown restaurant and bar police said.
Police have declined to say whether there are any suspects in Newhouse’s case.
####
Athlete posts reward for the safe return of missingstudent – CRIME: The family suspects that the 20-year-old CalPolystudent from Irvine was kidnapped.
Orange County Register, The (Santa Ana, CA) (Published as The Orange County Register) – November 20, 1998Browse Issues
Author: BRUCE MURRAY; The Orange County Register
Anaheim Angels center fielder Jim Edmonds and his agent are offering $50,000 for information leading to the safe return of an Irvine High School graduate and CalPoly San Luis Obispo studentmissing for a week.
Rachel Newhouse, 20, has been missing since about midnight Nov. 12, when she was last seen leaving a fraternity-sorority party at a Mexican restaurant in San Luis Obispo.
She left alone and did not have her car that night, witnesses at the restaurant told police. Newhouse, who had been drinking with others at the party, apparently intended to walk home – about two miles from the restaurant.
“We are worried sick about her, and we’re just praying,” said Peter Morreale, an uncle and family spokesman.
Newhouse’s parents, Irvine residents Phillip and Montel Newhouse, are in San Luis Obispo. Family members are also offering a $10,000 reward for their daughter’s return.
an Luis Obispo police said Tuesday they had shifted their focus from a missing-person case to a criminal investigation. Police would not specify the type of crime they are considering.
orreale said the circumstances of the situation are clearly that of a kidnapping.
“It’s pretty easy to figure out what kind of crime we’re dealing with,” he said.
Kathy McNutt, a student at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, who graduated from Irvine High with Newhouse in 1996, and another friend, Andrea West, also from Irvine, said Newhouse did not have a boyfriend. They said it would be out of character for her to run off with someone or just leave without telling anyone.
“I talked to her at least once a day, so it’s very odd that she wouldn’t have called,” West said. “It just seems so unreal what’s happening.”
“We have been friends for a long time,” said McNutt. “This is horrible.”
In a news release, Edmonds and sports agent Dwight Manley said they are “deeply concerned about the safety of our children and young adults. ” The reward money is for any information leading to the return of Newhouse and arrest of her possible abductor.
Newhouse is described as 5 feet 6 inches tall, 120 pounds, with brown hair and brown eyes.
Anyone with information on Newhouse should call San Luis Obispo police at (805) 781-7317.
Caption: BLACK & WHITE PHOTO RACHEL NEWHOUSE: Last seen leaving a party at a Mexican restaurant in San Luis Obispo.
******
PARENTS SAY POLICE BUNGLING SEARCH FOR MISSING DAUGHTER
Ledger Dispatch (CA) – November 14, 1997Browse Issues
Author: STEVE LAWRENCE
SACRAMENTO University of California and California State University police chiefs say their officers are well-trained and don’t hesitate to call for help from other law enforcement agencies when they need it.
But the parents of a missingCalPoly-San Luis Obispo student told a state Senate committee Thursday that police on that campus mishandled their daughter’s disappearance.
“The message that we received for a month was comparable to the situation (that would exist) if our daughter’s bicycle had been stolen,” Denise Smart told the Senate Budget and Fiscal Review Committee.

“Our ongoing pleas to have this case handed over to an experienced investigative agency were repeatedly rejected.”
Kristin Smart, a 19-year-old freshman from Stockton, disappeared in May 1996 after attending a fraternity party
Denise Smart said campus police initially took a “let’s-wait-and-see” attitude, suggesting that Kristin had run away or merely left for the long Memorial Day weekend without telling her parents or friends.
But Smart said she knew better, because her daughter’s makeup was still in her dorm room.
“She loved her makeup,” Smart said. “When the girls told me that the makeup was in the room I said, No way.’ But no one would listen.”
Smart said the investigation “continues to be a case without a lead agency. The San Luis Obispo sheriff’s department advises us that they are merely assisting the university, while CalPoly insists that the case was turned over to the sheriff . . . Who is in charge?”
Officers have questioned a male student about Kristin’s disappearance, but no arrest has been made.
No one from CalPoly testified at the hearing, but campus officials released a statement saying that the school’s Public Safety Department had, “since the inception of this case, worked cooperatively with other law enforcement agencies that have expressed confidence in Public Safety’s handling of those aspects of the investigation in which it has been involved.

Cal Poly San Luis Obispo News Archive Part 3: Genius Abuse

Let’s take a break from murder and rape for a bit…I want to relate a unique anecdote….this was not a news item but another thing that happened that indicated massive corruption to me early on….

It’s February, a brand new millennium. I have a great professor who had the ability to help me understand object-oriented-design. without his help, I would’ve flunked out of my computer science classes, placed on probation and booted. He’s a good guy, a great teacher. He saved my ass.

He’s also a genius. Unquestionably. with that normally comes w/ quirkiness – strange behavior. This associate professor had worked at IBM, JPL (and subsequently NASA)…most Cal Poly professors have PhD’s…it’s likely required. Let’s call him “Carl” (in honor of Carl Sagan). Carl graduated from CalTech – with the only doctorate they offer: (clinical science and medical science programs are avail, but the MD is granted via UCLA or USC)

From CalTech’s Graduate Program online reference:
   
    Doctor of Philosophy

The degree of Doctor of Philosophy is conferred by the Institute primarily in recognition of breadth of scholarship, depth of research, and the power to investigate       problems independently and efficiently, rather than for the completion of definite courses of study through a stated period of residence. The work for the degree         must consist of research and the preparation of a thesis describing it, and of systematic studies of an advanced character, primarily in science or engineering.

Translation: there is no program….you present a comprehensive study and solution for a real world scientific problem with NO HELP OR ADVICE, all by yourself. Carl never said what it was …considering he worked for JPL it is probably classified.

Carl ended up at IBM because he was head-hunted away from JPL/NASA….they offered him a LOT of money…by the 90s IBM’s market share was being erroded by Compaq, Dell, HP and Gateway. We’ll never know what they paid him but I assure you it was probably triple his salary at JPL.

The problem with IBM is that Carl’s a genius, he doesn’t want to design a better processor to run Windows on….he also doesn’t like the corporate environment-a cubicle? HR seminars? Politics? 25 bosses? deadlines? performance reviews? this doesn’t work for a creative mind that is incomprehensibly intelligent – the right and left brain both firing on all cylinders. Carl was either fired or quit….he didn’t want all that money, but he still needed a job.

So he took one at Cal Poly. Why not? For all the bad things I’ve said about Cal Poly, w/o our Computer Science, Computer Engineering and Electrical Engineering alumni there is no Silicon Valley. No Intel. No Oracle. Graduates can build an operating system; they can create a new programming language AND a compiler for it. For CSC majors, after a brutal 101-103 freshman program, sophomores get the 205-206 brutality slave-labor program (if you don’t LOVE building software, you will quit after 205 or during 206 (Teams of 5 or 6 “get to” build an enterprise system for the university or the city. I had a choice between rebuilding the Cal Poly Computer Science Web Site OR build a card-reader system for the bus-system in SLO (Like a day-pass for OCTA) – YES it has to work and yes it actually gets used.

So the city or the college can farm out every upgrade, problem or project to subsequent students who do it for free! “Learn by Doing” Right?

I’m off-topic, back to Carl.

The two classes Carl taught me were concerned with Object Oriented Design; an abstract way of writing code and structuring it in more of a human way and less of a machine way.* He never demanded outrageous workloads like the other engineering professors, these were lab classes so had to verify our theoretical understanding by assigning real world problems and testing the solutions we designed.  A lab project could take 2 hours, 2 days, 2 weeks, or some (I have one) never get solved.

Carl’s way of teaching (he wasn’t a teacher….as I said) always made it so the complex problems were easy to “divide and conquer” that is, to break a large problem down into x sub-problems, then separate each down into x(squared) easy problems, solve those, which will solve x and assemble the x to solve the original problem. I had to bash my head against the wall for 100 hours a week sometimes just to finish 1 dumb project that someone who “got it” could finish in an afternoon. He gave me confidence, made me feel like “not an idiot” as all the other profs and CSC students had…

I even made a friend in his classes, we had mutual respect for each other cuz we were both getting B’s (that’s a big deal a 2.0 is considered just fine, even though a 1.9 in one 10-week qtr puts you on probation, a 2.0 the next qtr takes you off of it – I graduated with 2.8 – a C+) We also weren’t people who had been programming since they were 5 yrs old. It made me wonder why CP accepted me into the major? I qualified for the Engineering College, but from day 1 it was clear that expertise in math and a love for video games did NOT qualify me to compete with anyone. Had he not taught me QUICK…I’d never made it past sophomore year.

Carl comes in one day. Late for class. He looks REALLY PISSED. This was not uncommon. He was always friendly, but he never seemed happy….he had this blank stare sometimes and I detected something(s) personal or tragic were still bothering him or ongoing. He was red-faced and sweating….he just sort-of paced around the room while we sat there, maybe 5 or 10 minutes.

He was about to say something. He was trying to decide whether or not to say it….most likely HOW to say it

Carl was probably the first to ever come right out and say what I was already feeling at the time about the college: greed, lies, perception – common themes so far.

Finally he relaxed and walked up front.

“How much money do you guys think I make?“——I was stunned. Everyone was. What the FUCK…is he talking anout?

“Seriously…I want you guys to think and as soon as you have a guess call it out.”

Nobody raised their hand or said shit….but I was definitely thinking about it. WE all knew he had a PhD from CalTech, that he’d spent about a decade at JPL/NASA and that he’d come from IBM as a Sr. R&D project manager at IBM….in 1999 his salary at IBM couldn’t have been less that 100k. I knew he’d taken a pay cut….prob a big one to be here…he wasn’t tenured, but this Cal Poly – Engineering – Computer Science. You can’t apply for a job like that. IF they ever need someone….they’ll find an established, possibly world-renowned software theorist. Someone famous among software engineers at minimum.

It was in-between 40k and 60k… it HAD to be. when he started asking us individually, most were guessing between 50k and 80k. That was a bit high, but he was full-time this was his only job.

“Chris – how much?”

“uhhh….you probably get like $50,000 a year?”

Polling the whole class indicated we thought he made about $60,000+. Then he projected the over head on the white-board. It was a copy of his paycheck for the previous month, he’d blacked out his SSN, but everything else was there….more personal info I’d want a classroom full of software engineers to have, that’s for sure. He was payed by the College of Engineering by a payroll clerk, monthly….and it said that he’d been paid $1200 for the previous month.

Ok, wait, what? That’s $300 a week. I knew he was putting in 50 hours easy….that’s SIX DOLLARS an hour. My first real job was at Starbucks…I started in 1997 and entry-level was $6.50 PLUS I got an extra 3-4 bucks per hour in tips. He broke it down that way too.

“I make less than minimum wage….[he went on to explain because he’d been there less than year there was some provision that made him an associate professor but somehow he wasn’t accredited, or some rule change had come through and his monthly check had dropped significantly] …My rent is $1000, this isn’t enough for me to EAT!”

He said he had some money saved up from IBM and that without that and barring a significant change to “What they promised me…” He’d quit. and they he went on at length about how he’d “been cheated,” and “lied to” that “he had offers from other universities when he left IBM but Cal Poly  offered the best incentives to him.”

They said he’d only work about 20-30 hours a week, that most of it would just be office hours, where he could do whatever he wanted plus have access to all the same research tools he’d had at IBM (If anything we probably had better). To become tenured you HAVE to conduct research AND publish…for most it’s commentary in professional or academic journals. If there’s anyone I wish published a book on software design, it’s him. His software runs on the Hubble Space Telescope. He was told he’d make about $45,000 a year with bonuses for student performance, peer-review, admin-review and publishing papers and books. He’d been conducting research and publishing results in professional journals for 20 years, he was still doing so.

Most journals are like online forums, you establish credibility by working and publishing, but the I don’t that JAMA gives any money to doctors for publishing research….it’s just a major honor to have the most respected publication in your profession print YOUR work.

One thing every company or contractor or client I’ve ever worked for either explicitly states- to NOT tell co-workers, supervisors, customers associates what you make. It’s a firable offense at many companies.

This was the first time I’d ever had the inkling that professors were being scammed. Whatever the power structure was…the associate professors are definitely not part of it.

Companies like Sun Microsystems (now Oracle), HP, Intel, Silicon Graphics, Applied Materials, Cisco Systems POURED money into computer science and computer engineering at Poly. Carl left sometime in 2001…the dotcom bubble blew up, but so did the WTC…so whatever $ Cal Poly lost out on from all the big companies that were laying off 1000s of tech workers, most pulled the plug on donations I’m sure, but the DoD, the CIA, DARPA, DIA, FBI and the newly-formed Dept. of Homeland Security MORE than picked up the slack to keep churning out 1st class engineers from 1st class Engineering Colleges….so Cal Poly didn’t lose a cent.

As for Carl…if he had any trouble finding a diff. job when he left…it’s almost guaranteed he was folded back into government software research or a contractor like TRW, KBR or Raytheon.

I’m sure he’s fine. Better off w/o Cal Poly….

*****COMING SOON****** ill mention the professor “acquired” as depy. chairman post 9/11. He worked for AT&T….sort of. During the cold war the DoD got a big security project approved…..In the event of pre-emptive nuclear strike….how would communication lines stay open? The project required that land-lines have multi-tiered failsafes…ever notice that your land-line works when the power goes out? No? cuz of your cell phone…well it does. It was a project that took 20 years. this particular maniac was the project manager. That means reworking the land-line system to withstand hydrogen-bombs landing across the continent would not effect your ability to call Washington from Sunnyvale….that was HIS RESPONSIBILITY. I’ll mention that and a few other changes made post 9/11 coming soon.

*It is still the gold standard for every program used today. Major OOD languages are listed in order:  Smalltalk and LISP, Eiffel, C++, Java, .NET, Python and C#. Java was the the most cutting-edge language, so Carl taught me to write both in C++ and Java. This theory of design is evidenced by the browser you are using to read this, the operating system your iPhone, tablet or console runs on (OS X, ios7, Windows 8, Android KitKat) all of these were designed using objects and implemented using one of these languages or non-object languages that have since been re-designed to BE object-oriented (COBOL, Pascal, VB, Ada and C)